Scotland looks to Norway alcohol policy / News / The Foreigner

Scotland looks to Norway alcohol policy. The amount of alcohol drunk in Scotland compared to England and Wales is the highest in 17 years. In an effort to combat the problem, Scotland is now considering the Norwegian model, reports say. People in Scotland drink an average of 25% more per person than in England, with twice as many alcohol related deaths north of the border.Approximately 65,000 children live in homes where there is a problem with alcohol. In addition to adults young people also cause problems, with drinking teenagers going on to vandalise property. Adults have blamed this on there being nothing for them to do.

scotlanddrinkingproblem, norwegianalcoholpolicy, tvalcoholadsnorway, eftacourt



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS



News Article

LATEST:

Scotland looks to Norway alcohol policy

Published on Tuesday, 4th October, 2011 at 08:55 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith and Michael Sandelson      .
Last Updated on 5th October 2011 at 20:22.

The amount of alcohol drunk in Scotland compared to England and Wales is the highest in 17 years. In an effort to combat the problem, Scotland is now considering the Norwegian model, reports say.

All kinds of beers
All kinds of beers
Photo: Silvio Tanaka/Flickr


People in Scotland drink an average of 25% more per person than in England, with twice as many alcohol related deaths north of the border.Approximately 65,000 children live in homes where there is a problem with alcohol.

In addition to adults young people also cause problems, with drinking teenagers going on to vandalise property. Adults have blamed this on there being nothing for them to do.

Scottish Labour Party Leader Iain Gray, sees the alcohol issue in Scotland as a serious cultural problem, he tells NRK.

“Alcohol is by far the biggest problem facing Scotland. It affects crime, it leads to violence, both in the home and on the street, and there are major health consequences.”

According to the broadcaster, the Scottish National Party (SNP), who have a majority, are now looking countries such as Norway for inspiration to solve its problem, and it is likely minimum pricing will be introduced. Whilst discounting Norway's government alcohol shop solution, Iain Gray believes, "we'll need to find a combination [of measures] in order to raise prices, whilst decreasing the availability of alcohol."

"Changing the availability of alcohol in this way is too drastic and will probably not be supported. However, we have already altered opening times for selling it considerably," he continues.

New laws have recently been introduced that stop supermarkets and other shops selling alcohol with offers such as ‘buy one, get one free’, and ‘three for £10’. Restrictions on advertisements in stores have also been introduced.

Doctor Evelyn Gillian from Alcohol Focus, Scotland’s biggest alcohol charity, told BBC’s Newsbeat that there are ways around these laws, however.

“Supermarkets can reduce the price so that you still get a deal. That is why we need minimum pricing.”

The Labour Party and Conservatives voted against the SNP's previous Parliamentary attempts to introduce a minimum pricing law for alcohol whilst it was a minority government between 2007 and 2011.

Meanwhile, Norway also may be forced to accept TV alcohol advertising following EU statements it will not be exempt from the new European Union TV Directive (AVMSD).



Published on Tuesday, 4th October, 2011 at 08:55 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith and Michael Sandelson      .
Last updated on 5th October 2011 at 20:22.

This post has the following tags: scotlanddrinkingproblem, norwegianalcoholpolicy, tvalcoholadsnorway, eftacourt.





  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!