Scrap hour change in Norway - MP / News / The Foreigner

Scrap hour change in Norway - MP. The Scandinavian country should just have one time all the year round. This would be an important benefit, an MP argues. “Putting the clocks forward to Summer Time has health-related consequences and disturbs the body’s biorhythms unnecessarily,” Jenny Klinge, leader of the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Justice for the Centre Party (Sp) tells The Foreigner. “Doing so has been shown to cause a higher incidence of blood clots and heart attacks too.”

time, hourchange, norway, summer, winter



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Scrap hour change in Norway - MP

Published on Tuesday, 28th October, 2014 at 06:52 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 28th October 2014 at 07:21.

The Scandinavian country should just have one time all the year round. This would be an important benefit, an MP argues.

DeLorean's DMC-12
The hour change between Summer Time and Winter Time has not been constant. This picture, taken near the Greenwich Observatory, shows the actual car used in the 'Back to the Future' films.DeLorean's DMC-12
Photo: ©2014 Michael Sandelson/The Foreigner


“Putting the clocks forward to Summer Time has health-related consequences and disturbs the body’s biorhythms unnecessarily,” Jenny Klinge, leader of the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Justice for the Centre Party (Sp) tells The Foreigner.

“Doing so has been shown to cause a higher incidence of blood clots and heart attacks too.”

A so-termed ‘Standard Time’ would reduce the vehicle accident rate too. Springtime, in Norway, which in effect results in one hour’s less sleep, sees a rise in this, according to her.

Non-observance

The Kamchatka Peninsula, GMT +12:00
The Kamchatka Peninsula, GMT +12:00
Jeff Schmaltz/NASA Earth Observatory
“Summer Time also causes stress and irritation, as well as issues for people with sleep problems and those having to take medicines at the same time(s) each day” Ms Klinge says.

Some countries in Europe do not take account of Daylight Saving Time (DST). Belarus ended this in the spring of 2011 after putting the clocks forward. It now observes Greenwich Mean Time (GMT/UTC) +3:00 the whole year (currently up to 2019) – DST was observed there between 1941 and 1944, and from 1981 to 2010.

Russia also introduced the measure in the spring of 2011 (permanent Daylight Saving Time), though the country has 11 different time zones due to geographic extent. Permanent Standard Time started this year.

Kaliningrad (formerly Königsberg, birthplace of German philosopher Immanuel Kant, for example) observes GMT +2:00, with Moscow at GMT +3:00.

Further east, places such as Samara, Yekaterinburg, Omsk, Krasnoyarsk, and Irkutsk observe GMT +4:00-GMT +8:00, respectively.

The respective time zones in Yakutsk, Vladivostok, Srednekolymsk (Sakha Republic), and Kamchatka are between GMT +9:00 and GMT +12:00.

Reykjavik on Iceland is not observing Daylight Saving Time up to and including 2019, meaning it is permanently on GMT until then.

Experiment in Britain

Big Ben
Big Ben
Public domain/Wikimedia Commons
The UK is currently on GMT, with so-termed British Summer Time (BST) in effect between the last Sunday in March and the last Sunday in October. This is in line with Europe (which is at GMT +1:00 at the moment).

Britain has also seen years without the GMT/BST distinction. BST was first established by the 1916 Summer Time Act following a campaign by Surrey-born William Willett (1856-1915), a builder.

1940 during the Second World War was an anomaly in relation to subsequent years. The clocks were not put back from BST that year (GMT +1:00), with British Double Summer Time (BDST) in effect between 1941 and 1945 (meaning Britain was on GMT +2:00). The end of the summer of 1945 saw the clocks being returned to GMT.

Two years later in 1947, fuel shortages led to the clocks being advanced by one hour twice in the spring and put back by one hour twice in the autumn.

Labour Party Prime Minister Harold Wilson (1916-1995) introduced the British Standard Time Experimentduring his time in power. Clocks were kept at GMT +1:00 between 27th October 1968 and 31st October 1971.

The Summer Time and Winter Time conventions were put back in place after then following a 366 to 81 House of Commons vote in favour of ending the experiment.

Norwegian vacillation

Norway has also had its backs and forwards regarding the hour change. Summer Time (GMT +2:00) was observed in 1916, 1943-45, and between 1959 and 1965. It applied all year round in the period from 11th August 1940 up to and including 2nd November 1942.

1980 saw the start of Summer Time being observed every year, with the debate as to whether to jettison this idea arising now and then. Norway followed all EU countries’ decision to change the clocks twice a year on the same date from 1996 onwards.

Jenny Klinge MP
Jenny Klinge MP
Bernt Sønvisen/Flickr
“The argument for differentiating between Summer Time and Winter Time was originally based on electricity saving. But this isn’t good enough in this day and age regarding today’s industry,” states Jenny Klinge MP. “Maintaining Standard Time the whole year is also a method of making things simpler and stripping away unnecessary bureaucracy.”

But won’t removing the scheme put Norway out of kilter with the rest of Europe?

“Yes, and this is an important issue. That’s why I’ve raised the matter of keeping Standard Time all year round with two Ministers of Trade and Industry – Labour’s (Ap) Trond Giske, and the Conservative Party’s (H) Monica Mæland. But they haven’t shown any willingness to take this further with the EU.”

How much support for this suggestion is there in parliament?

“Establishing Standard Time isn’t an issue the Centre Party is ratifying. I’m expressing the opinion many people have. It must be possible to concern oneself with something people care about. There’s also the possibility of introducing a Private Members’ Bill in parliament,” Ms Klinge concludes.



Published on Tuesday, 28th October, 2014 at 06:52 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 28th October 2014 at 07:21.

This post has the following tags: time, hourchange, norway, summer, winter.





  
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