Sneaking popular in Norway / News / The Foreigner

Sneaking popular in Norway. Officials in some of the largest public services say Norwegians actively inform on their fellow citizens. Armed with a phone and a conscience, on the road or otherwise, members of the public do not hesitate to ring state offices about motoring and money matters. “We get many tip-offs about dangerous overtaking, high speed, of lorries driving too close to other vehicles in particular,” traffic police chief Runar Karlsen tells Vårt Land, alleging the quality of the information matches the level of people’s trust in the force.

norwegianlabourandwelfareadministration, taxauthorities, customs, laanekassen, norwegianstateeducationalloanfund, cheatline



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Sneaking popular in Norway

Published on Wednesday, 27th April, 2011 at 15:12 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 27th April 2011 at 16:06.

Officials in some of the largest public services say Norwegians actively inform on their fellow citizens.

Samsung mobile phone (illus. ph.)
Samsung mobile phone (illus. ph.)
Photo: Jun Acullador/Flickr


Armed with a phone and a conscience, on the road or otherwise, members of the public do not hesitate to ring state offices about motoring and money matters.

“We get many tip-offs about dangerous overtaking, high speed, of lorries driving too close to other vehicles in particular,” traffic police chief Runar Karlsen tells Vårt Land, alleging the quality of the information matches the level of people’s trust in the force.

Sverre Lindahl, Acting Director of NAV’s payments policing unit, says “the quality of information we get is variable, but many lead to changes to benefits, repayment demands, or even charges.”

Concerned citizens make 2,000 reports about possibly fraudulent activities each year, without NAV asking for these.

“Many relate to people alleging they are separated parents, even though both spouses live at the same address, as well as undeclared working income whilst on unemployment benefit,” says Mr Lindahl.

According to the Norwegian State Educational Loan Fund (LĂĄnekassen), students claim for more expenses than they are entitled to whilst living with their parents, whilst tax authorities commonly deal with cases of VAT and tax-avoidance.

Customs have a dedicated phone number, and report calls span in severity from non-payment of road tax, to drugs smuggling.

“Our main challenge is picking the right people to check up on,” says Deputy Director Geir Høiseth.



Published on Wednesday, 27th April, 2011 at 15:12 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 27th April 2011 at 16:06.

This post has the following tags: norwegianlabourandwelfareadministration, taxauthorities, customs, laanekassen, norwegianstateeducationalloanfund, cheatline.





  
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