Speeding parents pose danger to schoolchildren / News / The Foreigner

Speeding parents pose danger to schoolchildren. Police issue fines whilst safety organisation advises caution. Every year, motorists get into trouble with the police when driving near schools. The Norwegian Council for Road Safety (Trygg Trafikk) says it’s often speeding parents that are either picking up or dropping off their children who are the offenders.Unpredictable Today saw the start of a new school year for many. According to figures from the Institute of Transport Economics (Transportøkonomisk institutt) published in 2006, approximately 25 percent of children are driven to school. Most of the parents said that this was for practical reasons, whilst only 20 percent said that it was due to hazardous traffic.

schoolchildren, traffic, cars, speeding, drivers, unsafe, safety



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Speeding parents pose danger to schoolchildren

Published on Monday, 17th August, 2009 at 23:04 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Police issue fines whilst safety organisation advises caution.

School children beware road traffic sign
School children beware road traffic sign
Photo: Marilyn Barbone/Shutterstock Images


Every year, motorists get into trouble with the police when driving near schools. The Norwegian Council for Road Safety (Trygg Trafikk) says it’s often speeding parents that are either picking up or dropping off their children who are the offenders.

Unpredictable

Today saw the start of a new school year for many. According to figures from the Institute of Transport Economics (Transportøkonomisk institutt) published in 2006, approximately 25 percent of children are driven to school. Most of the parents said that this was for practical reasons, whilst only 20 percent said that it was due to hazardous traffic.

“Many new pupils and children are going to be out amongst traffic. They are impulsive and unpredictable, and accidents can happen easily. We encourage motorists to show consideration, and drive calmly on roads where there are schoolchildren,” assistant chief constable Roar Skjellbred Larsen in the police’s traffic division tells the Norwegian News Agency (NTB).

Kari Sandberg, the Council’s director, says that parents who drive their children to school contribute to a higher traffic-density near the schools. As a result, conditions are made more complicated, especially when cars have to reverse or turn round

Experience

Both Larsen and Sandberg encourage parents to accompany their children to school on foot instead, so they can learn what to do when they are near traffic, thus making their journey to school safer.

“Talk to them about what they encounter along the way...Children need to gain traffic experience. They have to learn to be good pedestrians and cyclists. This knowledge will be useful to them in later life,” she says.

Walking to school has other benefits too.

“There is a clear connection between physical exercise whilst one is young, and physical health when one is older...We see that many children don’t get enough exercise today. This can affect health, weight, and coordination,” says Sandberg.

The Council says that approximately 60,000 children will be going to school for the first time this year.



Published on Monday, 17th August, 2009 at 23:04 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: schoolchildren, traffic, cars, speeding, drivers, unsafe, safety.





  
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