Statoil In Aménas hostage crisis report released / News / The Foreigner

Statoil In Aménas hostage crisis report released. Norway’s Statoil has released its own investigation report from the In Aménas hostage crisis. Commissioned by the company, the report was carried out by six independent members. The team was led by former head of Norway’s intelligence service Torgeir Hagen.                   The crisis took place in January this year when an al-Qaeda-linked terrorist group took hostages at the In Aménas gas plant, in Algeria.

statoilalgeria, inamenas



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Statoil In Aménas hostage crisis report released

Published on Friday, 13th September, 2013 at 17:03 under the news category, by Linn Schjerven and Michael Sandelson   .

Norway’s Statoil has released its own investigation report from the In Aménas hostage crisis.

Sign in the desert
Sign in the desert
Photo: Kjetil Alsvik/Statoil


Commissioned by the company, the report was carried out by six independent members. The team was led by former head of Norway’s intelligence service Torgeir Hagen.                  

The crisis took place in January this year when an al-Qaeda-linked terrorist group took hostages at the In Aménas gas plant, in Algeria.

Statoil, BP, and Algerian state-owned oil company Sonatrach jointly own and operate the facility.

The plant had 800 employees. 40 from different countries were killed in the attack, five of these were Norwegians.

The report includes a detailed run-through of the attack, an assessment of the security risks, and the emergency response.

19 recommendations on how security, organizational and management measures should be operated in the future are given.

The team conducted 136 interviews and visited the In Aménas plant twice.

The report’s first conclusions listed are that outer and inner security measures failed to protect the people at the plant, and the Algerian military were neither able to detect nor prevent attackers reaching the site.

Security measures there were not constructed to withstand or delay an attack of this scale, and relied on military protection working effectively.

At yesterday’s press conference Mr Hagen stressed that “We will not apportion blame or liability, but contribute to learning.”

“The report is critical. We wouldn’t have done our job properly if it hadn’t been. The goal is to find out what Statoil can learn from this incident,” the broadcaster quoted him as saying.

Various local and international media outlets have pointed out the possibility that employees at the plant may have helped with the attack.

Claims have also been made that two of the attackers, Xristos Katsiroubas, 22, and 24-year-old Ali Medlej, were Canadian citizens. Both were killed by the Algerian Military action that followed.

According to Canadian broadcaster CBC, Mr Medlej obtained a job at the gas plant about a year before the attack took place.

“What we know that they [the terrorists] had knowledge about what was inside the plant and asked for leaders by name,” stated Torgeir Hagen at Thursday’s press conference.

These are the main conclusions of the investigation team, as written in the report:

On the attack:

The sum of out and inner security measures failed to protect people at the site from the attack on In Amenas on 16 January. The Algerian military were not able to detect and prevent the attackers from reaching the site. Security measures at the site were not constructed to withstand or delay an attack of this scale, and relied on military protection working effectively.

Neither Statoil nor the joint venture could have prevented the attack, but there is reason to question the extent of their reliance on Algerian military protection. Neither of them conceived of a scenario where a large force of armed attackers reached the facility.

The joint venture incident management team led the civilian crisis response, supported by Sonatrach and many other agencies on the ground. Statoil’s contribution to the overall emergency response was effective and professional. The investigation team has not identified areas where a different response by Statoil could have changed the outcome.

On security in Statoil:

Statoil has an established security risk management system, but the company’s overall capabilities and culture must be strengthened to respond to the security risks associated with operations in volatile and complex environments.

“The attack was a tragedy for those affected”, says Statoil CEO Helge Lund in a statement, “the report points out areas within our security work that require improvements and increased focus.”

In the report, Statoil pays tribute to the 40 persons killed.




Published on Friday, 13th September, 2013 at 17:03 under the news category, by Linn Schjerven and Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: statoilalgeria, inamenas.





  
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