Statoil in North American shale gas controversy / News / The Foreigner

Statoil in North American shale gas controversy. Norway’s state oil company Statoil was facing a backlash against its Canadian shale gas drilling projects this morning as environmental groups opposed its expansion. "The water is so low (in the Christina River), you can even walk across the river right now. It's only knee-high deep, our river. We're losing water. We're losing culture and our way of life,” Almer Herman, a native of Edmonton, told the Edmonton Journal following the first day of court proceedings of the State of Alberta vs. Statoil Canada Ltd. lawsuit. The Marcellus Coalition of oil companies, of which Statoil is a member, faces concerns that its drilling may have polluted local drinking water supplies. Other problems surround the project, including spoiling of the natural environment and dissatisfied locals demanding a share of the profits.

statoil, canadianoilsands, shalegas



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Statoil in North American shale gas controversy

Published on Tuesday, 21st June, 2011 at 22:15 under the news category, by Gareth Corfield.
Last Updated on 23rd June 2011 at 17:31.

Norway’s state oil company Statoil was facing a backlash against its Canadian shale gas drilling projects this morning as environmental groups opposed its expansion.

New Identity, Statoil
New Identity, Statoil
Photo: Øyvind Hagen/Statoil


"The water is so low (in the Christina River), you can even walk across the river right now. It's only knee-high deep, our river. We're losing water. We're losing culture and our way of life,” Almer Herman, a native of Edmonton, told the Edmonton Journal following the first day of court proceedings of the State of Alberta vs. Statoil Canada Ltd. lawsuit.

The Marcellus Coalition of oil companies, of which Statoil is a member, faces concerns that its drilling may have polluted local drinking water supplies. Other problems surround the project, including spoiling of the natural environment and dissatisfied locals demanding a share of the profits.

Similar protests, most notably by a Canadian group called For Our Grandchildren, have been taking place at Statoil’s tar sands drilling operations in Alberta. For Our Grandchildren is a Canadian senior citizens’ group dedicated to stopping the exploitation of tar sands in the region.

Besteforeldreaksjonen, the Norwegian Grandparents Climate Action, has previously published an open letter in the Edmonton Journal ‘apologising’ to Canada for Statoil’s drilling.

Statoil recently celebrated its tenth anniversary as a New York Stock Exchange listed company, despite the controversy surrounding its expanding operations,. The corporation expects to raise energy production from current levels of around 1.9 million barrels of oil equivalent to above 2.5 million barrels per day in 2020.

“Towards 2020 our ambition is to establish material positions in 3 - 5 offshore business clusters outside the Norwegian continental shelf and step up our shale gas and liquids production,” said Helge Lund, CEO of Statoil.



Published on Tuesday, 21st June, 2011 at 22:15 under the news category, by Gareth Corfield.
Last updated on 23rd June 2011 at 17:31.

This post has the following tags: statoil, canadianoilsands, shalegas.





  
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