Stavanger oil wages hit employment levels / News / The Foreigner

Stavanger oil wages hit employment levels. As almost 4,000 people in Norway are choosing to become pre-school teachers, qualified educators and nurses cannot afford properties in the hydrocarbon-dependant Stavanger region. Oil companies ‘sponsor’ their employees by providing interest-free mortgages, car loans as low as a boy-racer vehicle’s side-skirts, and grants towards kindergartens and day-care costs. Conditions are slightly different people in other professions, however. The region has jobs-a-plenty for those in the health and education sectors, with staff level shortages almost comparable to those of engineers, but Stavanger property and rental costs have gone through the roof.

stavangerpropertyprices, rentalpricesstavanger, expensivestavanger



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Stavanger oil wages hit employment levels

Published on Tuesday, 24th April, 2012 at 12:45 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 24th April 2012 at 13:25.

As almost 4,000 people in Norway are choosing to become pre-school teachers, qualified educators and nurses cannot afford properties in the hydrocarbon-dependant Stavanger region.

Stavanger
Stavanger
Photo: Jacob Bøtter/Flickr


Shortage

Oil companies ‘sponsor’ their employees by providing interest-free mortgages, car loans as low as a boy-racer vehicle’s side-skirts, and grants towards kindergartens and day-care costs.

Conditions are slightly different people in other professions, however. The region has jobs-a-plenty for those in the health and education sectors, with staff level shortages almost comparable to those of engineers, but Stavanger property and rental costs have gone through the roof.

Recent examples of exorbitant prices include average monthly rental costs of 12,920 kroner, and 2.8 million kroner for a 70 square metre (approximately 753 square foot) apartment. This has resulted in low teacher and nurse applicant numbers for the entire region, a problem that is growing.

“We’re seeing that even Stavanger University Hospital now has problems filling vacant positions. There are many available jobs in Stavanger and Hå municipalities. Sandnes municipality is also struggling, even with increased salaries,” Solfrid Fuglseth, acting leader of the Norwegian Nurses Organisation for Rogaland tells Aftenbladet.

The municipality’s Kirsten Harstad says, “according to official figures, 25 percent of nursing jobs remain unfilled, but it is higher.”

Creative

Budget airline Norwegian has recently criticised the region’s expensiveness, saying price levels and choice are better in Bergen. 

“The challenge is food and drink prices are about to become extreme, even for Norwegians. Hotel room costs already are,” commercial director Daniel A. Skjeldam declared, “You might have to pay 350 kroner for a mediocre meal in Stavanger’s pedestrian area, but Bergen has more and better alternatives.”

Consequently, the carrier has consciously not prioritised tourist flights in the same way.

“Price-levels in the Stavanger region will generally exclude the European citizen if these are based on oil industry salaries,” said Mr Skjeldam.

On average, oil workers earn over one million kroner per year. Annual salaries for nurses and teachers are between 370,000 and 385,000 kroner.

Meanwhile, whilst top tourism and business people are divided on the accuracy of Mr Skjeldam’s comments, 27-year-old pre-school teacher Ingunn Rørnes, who shares apartment rental costs with two others, exclaims, “I can’t afford to buy myself a property here. We have to find ourselves a partner in the oil industry if we want to stay.”

Flatmate, Kristine Drange, believes pooling resources is a possible answer amongst rising house prices.

“I’ve heard that nurses and engineers are a good match,” the 30-year-old exclaims, laughing.



Published on Tuesday, 24th April, 2012 at 12:45 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 24th April 2012 at 13:25.

This post has the following tags: stavangerpropertyprices, rentalpricesstavanger, expensivestavanger.





  
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