Stavanger to get English signposts / News / The Foreigner

Stavanger to get English signposts. Architect suggests making them vandal-proof. Lost or confused tourists and visitors to Stavanger are to get a helping hand in the future. Stavanger Sentrum AS (STAS) has taken the initiative to suggest mounting English-only signposts, after what they claim to be repeated requests by the city’s tourist guides. A workgroup has concluded that between 13 and 15 centrally-located places are to get the over two metre high direction-pointers, bringing Stavanger in line with other large cities on the Continent, writes Stavanger Aftenbladet.

stavanger, norway, english, signposts, directions, tourists, visitors



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News Article

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Stavanger to get English signposts

Published on Wednesday, 16th December, 2009 at 11:27 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Architect suggests making them vandal-proof.

Illustration of street signs in English
Illustration of street signs in English
Photo: Rumag Skilt og Reklame AS, Stavanger


Lost or confused tourists and visitors to Stavanger are to get a helping hand in the future. Stavanger Sentrum AS (STAS) has taken the initiative to suggest mounting English-only signposts, after what they claim to be repeated requests by the city’s tourist guides.

A workgroup has concluded that between 13 and 15 centrally-located places are to get the over two metre high direction-pointers, bringing Stavanger in line with other large cities on the Continent, writes Stavanger Aftenbladet.

Turid Haaland, the council’s chief architect, believes STAS’ suggestion will cause a lot of discussion, saying they should be solid.

“These types of signs are particularly attractive to vandals. Vågen had a signpost in English once, but it ended up looking like a withered Christmas tree,” she tells the paper.

Stavanger committee for urban development will start considering the issue in early January.



Published on Wednesday, 16th December, 2009 at 11:27 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: stavanger, norway, english, signposts, directions, tourists, visitors.





  
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