Stavanger's drunken violence problem / News / The Foreigner

Stavanger's drunken violence problem. Drunken Norwegian youths are turning picturesque Stavanger’s waterfront into a scene of violence, reports say. Very few weekends pass without police reporting several drink-related episodes in Stavanger, harmless or otherwise. Official police logs show eight people were arrested in the early hours, Sunday, as a preventative measure against possible violence. Stavanger District Court has processed almost fifty cases of assault and battery this autumn alone, half committed by men in their 20s. Over 80 percent of them were under the influence of alcohol at the time, and most of these offences occurred in the city centre, reports NRK.

stavangerdrunkeness, drunkpeoplestavanger, drunkenviolence



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Stavanger's drunken violence problem

Published on Monday, 14th November, 2011 at 17:07 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Drunken Norwegian youths are turning picturesque Stavanger’s waterfront into a scene of violence, reports say.

In Stavanger
In Stavanger
Photo: christoph.grothaus/Flickr


Domestic problem

Very few weekends pass without police reporting several drink-related episodes in Stavanger, harmless or otherwise. Official police logs show eight people were arrested in the early hours, Sunday, as a preventative measure against possible violence.

Stavanger District Court has processed almost fifty cases of assault and battery this autumn alone, half committed by men in their 20s. Over 80 percent of them were under the influence of alcohol at the time, and most of these offences occurred in the city centre, reports NRK.

“Several parts of my face were broken [by my assailant] and I’ve had three operations. I was on sick leave for months,” says one victim of violence, who was attacked for defending his wife verbally.

Per A. Thorbjørnsen, who represents the Liberal Party (V) on Stavanger municipality’s licensing committee, tells The Foreigner that, “unfortunately, the problem of alcohol or drugs-related violence in the city centre is nothing new. Stavanger has had approximately the same number of nightspots and opening hours since the mid-90s.”

“Whilst police allege the number of cases has sunk in recent years, there are many indications the number of violent crimes and their ferocity has actually increased.”

Stavanger’s licensing committee imposed a ban on outside drinking in the early 2000’s, which it overturned at the end of 2009. Two years ago, the government suggested shortening drinking time by one hour, and the debate has been raging ever since.

Mr Thorbjørnsen says, however, violence in the centre of the town is mainly because “over 80 percent of alcohol consumption takes place at home before people go out.”

He is also worried about drink-related violence that over 150,000 children on a national basis suffer at home. Drunk parents are a threat to their children, especially on holiday. , and Norwegians are critical to their own drinking culture.

Police failings

“The other problem is that fewest possible police are on duty at night, when they are needed the most. I think they have underestimated this importance over the years and got it wrong about how much they mean at night,” says Mr Thorjørnsen.

Socialist Left Party (SV) politician Eirik Faret Sakariassen, who sits on Stavanger city council, the licensing committee’s higher body, finds the drunken violence that has developed in town “disagreeable”.

“I see many examples of violence when I go out. People are too drunk to take care of themselves. People don’t feel safe in the city centre. Others are also worried when their loved ones are out.”

He continues, saying police currently “nanny adult people instead of being able to be more visible on the streets, which is part of the big picture.”

“The main issue is we have to do something about the alcohol laws. SV has proposed stopping serving at midnight,” argues Mr Sakariassen, who says the city council, will be reviewing these at some stage before next summer.

According to Per Thobjørnsen, the licensing committee “is open to entering a discussion regarding opening times, but there has to be solid documentation showing that changing them will make a difference.”




Published on Monday, 14th November, 2011 at 17:07 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: stavangerdrunkeness, drunkpeoplestavanger, drunkenviolence.





  
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