Stavanger’s ‘oil capital’ days could be numbered / News / The Foreigner

Stavanger’s ‘oil capital’ days could be numbered. A new oil discovery in the North Sea is bringing optimism to those living in Stavanger, but the city may be losing its position as the “oil capital”, some industry sources allege. Former Stavanger Mayor Leif Johan Sevland believes that Stavanger is the only place to be to get into the oil industry, but several in the business disagree. Not all oil companies have their main offices in Stavanger or near the North Sea. “The ‘oil capital’ term is slightly on the wane. IT and Communications dominate our age now, which means geographical location is no longer important. We experience that an increasing number of people come from Stavanger to work here in Oslo,” Lundin’s Managing Director, Torstein Sannes, explained to NRK.

stavangeroilcapital, stavangernorway



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Stavanger’s ‘oil capital’ days could be numbered

Published on Monday, 7th November, 2011 at 14:33 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith   .
Last Updated on 7th November 2011 at 16:55.

A new oil discovery in the North Sea is bringing optimism to those living in Stavanger, but the city may be losing its position as the “oil capital”, some industry sources allege.

Inner harbour of Stavanger
Inner harbour of Stavanger
Photo: Wikimedia Commons


Former Stavanger Mayor Leif Johan Sevland believes that Stavanger is the only place to be to get into the oil industry, but several in the business disagree. Not all oil companies have their main offices in Stavanger or near the North Sea.

“The ‘oil capital’ term is slightly on the wane. IT and Communications dominate our age now, which means geographical location is no longer important. We experience that an increasing number of people come from Stavanger to work here in Oslo,” Lundin’s Managing Director, Torstein Sannes, explained to NRK.

Lundin, with its main offices in Lysaker, is involved in the Aldous/Avaldsnes discovery west of Stavanger, together with Statoil and Det Norske oljeselskap. Det Norske's main office is in Trondheim.

Det Norske’s press spokeperson Torgeir Anda, who grew up in Stavanger, believes the city should be pleased that the oil industry in not based in one town, “as it is more important to be in the north.”

“I find that many people in Stavanger feel that the town will be less dominant than it is now. It seems to me that there is no reason for this.”

Meanwhile, Green Party member Torfinn Ingeborgrud, is worried about the consequences of Stavanger continuing with its nickname.

“Whilst being called the “oil capital” may be cool and tough here in Stavanger, but the term generally has a negative tone in other places in Norway and in Europe. Unfortunately, it’s almost like calling the place “the tobacco city”, or “the cancer city”.



Published on Monday, 7th November, 2011 at 14:33 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith   .
Last updated on 7th November 2011 at 16:55.

This post has the following tags: stavangeroilcapital, stavangernorway.





  
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