Stormy climate waters ahead for Norwegian government / News / The Foreigner

Stormy climate waters ahead for Norwegian government. There’s trouble at t’ mill for the Rightists after they laid forth their national budget for 2017. Supporting Parties the Liberals (V) and Christian Democrats (KrF) say they cannot continue their cooperation if things stand as they are on this issue. Withdrawal by both will cause the Conservative (H)-Progress (FrP) bipartite coalition government to fall.

climate, co2, budget, tax, greenhousegases, paywall



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS



News Article

LATEST:

Stormy climate waters ahead for Norwegian government

Published on Friday, 7th October, 2016 at 10:35 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 13th October 2016 at 21:19.

There’s trouble at t’ mill for the Rightists after they laid forth their national budget for 2017.

Vågen in Stavanger, Saturday
Vågen in Stavanger, Saturday
Photo: ©2015 Michael Sandelson/The Foreigner


Supporting Parties the Liberals (V) and Christian Democrats (KrF) say they cannot continue their cooperation if things stand as they are on this issue.

Withdrawal by both will cause the Conservative (H)-Progress (FrP) bipartite coalition government to fall.

Liberal Party leader Trine Skei Grande thinks that the job-friendly draft national budget proposal, which Progress’ Finance Minister Siv Jensen delivered, Thursday, contained “many good things”.

“But the climate part isn’t good enough,” she told national daily Aftenposten. “The Liberals cannot vote in favour of it [the budget].”

Duties on new cars and annual road tax prices are to be reduced. Taxes on CO2 emissions are left unchanged, however, irrespective of tax rises for fuel and NOx emissions.

Norway has ratified the international Paris Agreement on climate change, being among the first States to formally join it.

The Scandinavian country’s climate goals include a 40 per cent reduction of greenhouse gas emissions in 2030 compared with the 1990 level.

“The government’s proposal can hardly be seen as a contribution towards fulfilling the Paris deal,” said Terje Breivik, fiscal policy spokesperson for the Liberal Party, in a statement.

According to him, projections in the budget towards 2030 have singled out considerable rises in transport sector emissions.

“The sum of emissions reductions in 2030 is likely to be just 2 per cent, which is clearly not in line with Government, Parliamentary or Liberal Party objectives,” he declared

13 of 18 Liberal County leaders have told VG that they would consider bringing the government down if it stands firm on what is in the budget, VG reports.

Knut Arild Hareide, leader of the Christian Democrats, has told the tabloid that his Party would not be shoring up the coalition in the absence of Liberal support.

“I don’t see a solution involving just three Parties finding a budget agreement. All four have committed themselves to a substantial reduction in greenhouse gas emissions,” he commented.

Both the Liberals and Christian Democrats have expressed willingness to find solutions, but everyone must consent to negotiating, explained Mr Hareide.

“This means that the government must change course,” he declared.




Published on Friday, 7th October, 2016 at 10:35 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 13th October 2016 at 21:19.

This post has the following tags: climate, co2, budget, tax, greenhousegases, paywall.





  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!