Surprise Norway Japan-bound whale product export censured / News / The Foreigner

Surprise Norway Japan-bound whale product export censured. An out-of-the-blue four thousand kilo plus shipment of frozen whale products scheduled to arrive in Tokyo on April 12th from Norway has stirred the Animal Welfare Institute (AWI), reports say. The US-based lobby group concerned with humane treatment of animals wants the US and other world governments to look into this matter. Executive AWI Director Susan Millward has requested they apply pressure and “convince Japan to reject Norway’s recent shipment of whale products,” the Japan Daily Press and fishnewseu.com report.

norwaywhaling, whaleproductexportsnorway



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Surprise Norway Japan-bound whale product export censured

Published on Tuesday, 9th April, 2013 at 22:59 under the news category, by Shruti Chauhan and Michael Sandelson   .

An out-of-the-blue four thousand kilo plus shipment of frozen whale products scheduled to arrive in Tokyo on April 12th from Norway has stirred the Animal Welfare Institute (AWI), reports say.

Whale shot
Whale shot
Photo: Mariano P/Flickr


The US-based lobby group concerned with humane treatment of animals wants the US and other world governments to look into this matter.

Executive AWI Director Susan Millward has requested they apply pressure and “convince Japan to reject Norway’s recent shipment of whale products,” the Japan Daily Press and fishnewseu.com report.

The commercial trade ban of whale products under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora has been the basis of AWI’s protest. Norway has not exported whale meat since the 1980s, despite lifting its own ban in 2001.

Norway resumed commercial whaling operations in 1993, contravening the IWC commercial whaling ban.

Nonetheless, then US President Bill Clinton did not impose trade sanctions, partly because Norway was not exporting whale products.

A recent attempt to revive the Norwegian whale trade industry in 2008 suffered a setback. The Japanese government rejected company Myklebust Trading’s entire five-ton shipment of the Minke whale meat due to alleged contamination.

This same company is now reportedly behind the current 4,250 kg shipment. It left western Norway’s Ålesund, Møre og Romsdal County, in mid-February this year.

The Foreigner published an article in2011 about Norway and Japan voting against a Brazilian and Argentinian-backed proposal to create a whale sanctuary. This would have stretched as far North as the Equator and as far South as Cape Horn, promoted by Brazil and Argentina.

International Whaling Commission (IWC) officials say the 75 percent majority necessary for its implementation, has not been received to date despite repeated submissions.

Norway raised its annual Minke whaling quota from 885 to 1,286 in 2009. President Barack Obama’s administration criticized the timing of this move as they had worked hard at establishing an international whaling compromise.

This latest whaling incident has brought Iceland’s trading relationship with Japan to light as well. Whale meat from the island country amounts to 20 percent of the Japanese whale meat market.

President Obama decided in 2012 to levy diplomatic pressure on Iceland in a measured attempt to get the island to end commercial whaling operations.

“It is time for the Obama administration to take a stand against commercial whaling, and to remind Norway and Iceland that trade embargoes remain a possibility if whale exports continue,” states Animal Welfare Institute Executive Director Susan Millward.

The Norwegian Ministry of Fisheries and Coastal Affairs asked for some more time to comment on the issue when contacted by The Foreigner.



Published on Tuesday, 9th April, 2013 at 22:59 under the news category, by Shruti Chauhan and Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: norwaywhaling, whaleproductexportsnorway.





  
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