Swiss architect revives Norway Zinc Mines / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Swiss architect revives Norway Zinc Mines. Tourists visiting western Norway can see part of Norwegian industrial history from the 19th Century. The zinc mines in Allmannajuvet in Sauda, Ryfylke were in operation from 1881 to 1899 after a cottage farmer discovered a zinc-ore in the mountains of Sauda. During this time, up to 168 workers were busy extracting ore from these mines and loading it onto vessels bound for foreign shores. These mining operations kick-started hydroelectric power development and industrialization in Sauda. 

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Swiss architect revives Norway Zinc Mines

Published on Thursday, 10th July, 2014 at 09:02 under the news category, by Nikita Yasuf.

Tourists visiting western Norway can see part of Norwegian industrial history from the 19th Century.



The zinc mines in Allmannajuvet in Sauda, Ryfylke were in operation from 1881 to 1899 after a cottage farmer discovered a zinc-ore in the mountains of Sauda.

During this time, up to 168 workers were busy extracting ore from these mines and loading it onto vessels bound for foreign shores. These mining operations kick-started hydroelectric power development and industrialization in Sauda. 

The mine has not been in use for over 100 years, but over NOK 60 million (some USD 9.74/EUR7.14/GBP 5.68 million) has now been invested into the remote site for the purpose of developing the old mines and to provide the Ryfylke region with a new special tourist attraction. The project is part of the National Tourist Road Ryfylke development.

Company Aanesland Limtre will supply glued laminated timber to the Norwegian Public Roads Administration for their National Tourist Route project.

Swiss architect Peter Zumpthor has designed a building with parking areas, a service building and toilet facilities along the road route, as well as buildings in the ravine itself that will offer information and experiences of mining history.

The assembly of the service building took place in a workshop in Sauda on 1st July before the building was moved to Almannajuvet. The remainder of the project is scheduled for completion in the autumn of 2015.



Published on Thursday, 10th July, 2014 at 09:02 under the news category, by Nikita Yasuf.

This post has the following tags: norway, tourism, attractions, holidays.





  
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