Terror threat against oil platforms constant / News / The Foreigner

Terror threat against oil platforms constant. STAVANGER: Armed forces and the police carry out an anti-terror exercise to test preparedness in the event of a terrorist attack against Norway’s oil facilities. “It is a scenario that we have to practice, because the current state of the world means that we have to be prepared for any kind of threat. Moreover, as long as we have and operate oil installations and platforms, we also need to be aware of the fact that these can also be targets for potential terrorists,” Minister of Defence Ine Eriksen Søreide told The Foreigner, Tuesday. Top brass from both the Norwegian military and police gathered at western Norway’s Sola Airport to be briefed on security authorities’ annual anti-terror and security exercise called ‘Operation Gemini’.

terror, oil, 22ndjuly, paywall



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Terror threat against oil platforms constant

Published on Thursday, 9th June, 2016 at 12:42 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 9th June 2016 at 13:22.

STAVANGER: Armed forces and the police carry out an anti-terror exercise to test preparedness in the event of a terrorist attack against Norway’s oil facilities.

Defence Minister Ine Eriksen Søreide (R)
The Minister and Hans Vik, Chief of Police for Southwestern Norway Police District, standing in front of a Sea King at Stavanger Sola Airport.Defence Minister Ine Eriksen Søreide (R)
Photo: ©2016 Michael Sandelson/The Foreigner


“It is a scenario that we have to practice, because the current state of the world means that we have to be prepared for any kind of threat. Moreover, as long as we have and operate oil installations and platforms, we also need to be aware of the fact that these can also be targets for potential terrorists,” Minister of Defence Ine Eriksen Søreide told The Foreigner, Tuesday.

Top brass from both the Norwegian military and police gathered at western Norway’s Sola Airport to be briefed on security authorities’ annual anti-terror and security exercise called ‘Operation Gemini’.

Norway's police force is responsible for handling terror incidents, but the Armed Forces contribute with specially-trained taskforces to assist officers upon request. A civilian search and rescue Sea King helicopter is one of the aircraft used to provide personnel with support.

Operation Gemini’s objective is to reinforce and develop the military’s ability to support the police in implementing maritime counter-terrorist operations. One of the Special Forces Units’ tasks is being able to retake hijacked oil platforms and free the hostages on board.

Which events currently happening in the world make this year’s exercise particularly pertinent?

Norwegian Special Forces Unit personnel
Norwegian Special Forces Unit personnel
©2016 Michael Sandelson/The Foreigner
“I think that you can simply look around and see what type of terrorist groups are both operational in the Middle East, but also conducting operations on European soil,” Defence Minister Søreide said. “We know that they have intentions of, and the capacity to carry out attacks, and that’s why we need to be prepared for any kind of scenario.”

“A possible terror threat against our North Sea oil installations has been a relevant issue since 1984, when we carried out Operation Gemini for the first time. But the global terrorist expansion that we are currently witnessing certainly doesn’t make it less pertinent now than it was back then,” added Lieutenant General Rune Jakobsen, Commander of the Norwegian Joint Headquarters.

This year also sees the fifth anniversary of the twin terror attacks on Oslo and the island of Utøya. The 22nd July Commission sternly censured the police for their actions that day.

One of the criticisms was regarding response times, with Commission leader Alexandra Bech Gjørv describing what police did as “chaotic”.

Defence Minister Søreide, what has been done since 22nd July 2011 to improve response times and command structure?

“There have been many improvements in my opinion, and I can mostly see it from the Armed Forces’ perspective because that’s my responsibility. But what we have done is to try to pre-allocate resources to police officers so they can actually ask our commander at the Operational Headquarters for assistance directly. For instance, this regards transport helicopters, one thing that is often asked for.”

“We have reduced our response time for a helicopter so they can be even more quickly available for the police if they need it. We have also done a number of other things from the Armed Forces’ and Defence Ministry’s perspectives, making it even easier to use the total amount of the resources we have in a very long country with quite a challenging geography,” she concluded.



Published on Thursday, 9th June, 2016 at 12:42 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 9th June 2016 at 13:22.

This post has the following tags: terror, oil, 22ndjuly, paywall.





  
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