That was this week’s news, Saturday 11 January 2014 / News / The Foreigner

That was this week’s news, Saturday 11 January 2014. This past week’s highlight is a rather royal blunder by Scandinavian monarchs. Sunday: VG writes an article about lower house prices. They highlight negative-toned press can have a knock-on psychological effect, consequently making prices lower. Why add insult to injury? Monday: According to website ABC Nyheter, government coalition member Progress (FrP) has stopped asking questions in parliament since coming to power last year. They previously held the record for the highest number of questions asked there whilst in opposition. They have probably realised now they have nothing to say for themselves.

norwaynews, oddnews



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That was this week’s news, Saturday 11 January 2014

Published on Saturday, 11th January, 2014 at 21:38 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 12th January 2014 at 09:17.

This past week’s highlight is a rather royal blunder by Scandinavian monarchs.

Printing press
Printing press
Photo: Vasily Smirnov/Shutterstock Images


Sunday: VG writes an article about lower house prices. They highlight negative-toned press can have a knock-on psychological effect, consequently making prices lower. Why add insult to injury?

Monday: According to website ABC Nyheter, government coalition member Progress (FrP) has stopped asking questions in parliament since coming to power last year. They previously held the record for the highest number of questions asked there whilst in opposition. They have probably realised now they have nothing to say for themselves.

Tuesday: Knut Arild Hareide, leader of Centre-Right Party the Christian Democrats (KrF), has now started his paternity leave, Vårt Land reports. He will be out of politics until about the beginning of April. Mr Hareide’s religious numerology is impeccable: three months, not even six hours of straight sleep, and nine nappies a day for twelve weeks.  

Wednesday: VG reports journalists are trying to stop NRK airing further episodes of their new ironic programme called ”Mammon”, sold to several countries. They are going to the Press Complaints Commission, claiming it tears down credibility built up over 100 years. Having no sense of humour about one’s own profession doesn’t seem very sound.

Thursday: Their Royal Highnesses King Carl XVI Gustaf and Queen Silvia of Sweden decided not to attend the bicentennial celebrations of Norway’s Constitution on 17th May this year. The Royals subsequently changed their minds after receiving “additional information”, according to NRK. Someone at the IKEA country’s Palace in Stockholm must have had a screw loose.

Friday: A Norway Muslim extremist indicted for issuing threats and hate statements has applied to become a football referee, returning to his old hobby, reports NRK. Extreme whistle blowing seems to be a good choice of further pursuit.

Saturday: NTB writes that Norwegian Environment Agency officials ask their bigger brother peers at the Ministry of the Environment to assess whether salting the roads contravenes anti-pollution legislation: a potentially slippery issue that would rub salt into insurance companies’ post-claim pay-out wounds if it does.



Published on Saturday, 11th January, 2014 at 21:38 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 12th January 2014 at 09:17.

This post has the following tags: norwaynews, oddnews.





  
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