The 17th of May in Stavanger / News / The Foreigner

The 17th of May in Stavanger. How are you going to celebrate Norwegian national day this year? Both the International and British schools in Stavanger have their own plans. The 17 May is all about celebrating the Norwegian constitution. It’s quite amazing how almost an entire country is up early in the morning on what is officially a national holiday. If you haven’t seen the parades and wonderful national costumes, then it’s definitely worth going. So how are the local International and British schools going to be contributing on a day that really has nothing to do with them apart from living in the same country?The British School’s lead up For the last two weeks, the school’s Norwegian teacher has been explaining to all the pupils about 17 May. But that’s not all.

norwegian, national, day17, may, stavanger, parade, british, international, school



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The 17th of May in Stavanger

Published on Thursday, 14th May, 2009 at 22:16 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 17th May 2009 at 21:23.

How are you going to celebrate Norwegian national day this year? Both the International and British schools in Stavanger have their own plans.

Norwegian flag
Norwegian flag
Photo: Paul Cowan/Shutterstock Images


The 17 May is all about celebrating the Norwegian constitution. It’s quite amazing how almost an entire country is up early in the morning on what is officially a national holiday. If you haven’t seen the parades and wonderful national costumes, then it’s definitely worth going. So how are the local International and British schools going to be contributing on a day that really has nothing to do with them apart from living in the same country?

The British School’s lead up

For the last two weeks, the school’s Norwegian teacher has been explaining to all the pupils about 17 May. But that’s not all.

“In the Middle Year’s Programme’s technology class, new banners have been designed for each of the four houses in the school, and our front banner has Stavanger council’s logo against a backdrop of the Union Jack”, Mrs Margret Thomason, the school’s deputy head tells The Foreigner.

The start of the day

In most places, the local school bands will start playing at 7 a.m. The sheer joyfulness of the music or the bass drum will probably be the first thing you hear, and will definitely awaken you. Various speeches are made, honouring the fallen, and the flags are raised at 8 o’clock.

The children’s parade

This is scheduled to start at 9 o’clock, and they are normally very precise. Foreign pupils from both schools will meet up in a pre-designated place earlier, though. How international is the parade going to be then?

“This year, we are joined by students from France and Spain, two of the countries with which we have an exchange programme” says Dr Linda Duevel, the International School’s director.

But it’s not just about turning up and marching.

“We consider it an honour to be invited. The younger children will be at the front, with the older ones at the back; they are very proud about it. On top of their school uniform, they will be wearing a sash with their name on, and waving flags. People in the crowd normally call out their names, something which makes the younger children wonder how they know who they are”, Mrs Thomason says.

And according to Dr Duvel, their handbell choir will also be playing, in addition to carrying international flags.

Additional celebrations

Although 17 May is considered as a normal school day by the British School, it doesn’t mean that the celebrations stop after the end of the parade.

“The children will then be bussed back to school, where there will be hotdogs and cakes made by the Parent’s Association, together with some ice-cream. There’ll also be a bouncy castle” smiles Mrs Thomason.

The International School began participating in 1966, whilst the British School started 12 years later. Approximately 650 students from the International School and 250 from the British School will be marching in this year’s parade.



Published on Thursday, 14th May, 2009 at 22:16 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 17th May 2009 at 21:23.

This post has the following tags: norwegian, national, day17, may, stavanger, parade, british, international, school.





  
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