The 2013 Nobel Peace Prize: Five people relate their views / News / The Foreigner

The 2013 Nobel Peace Prize: Five people relate their views. OSLO: Hectic Nobel Peace Prize days are over. The Foreigner took a walk on main shopping street Karl Johan to ask people their experiences of the event and its happenings. The five interviewed either live or spent the week in Oslo. All five were asked the following three questions: 1. Have you been following the Peace Prize celebration? 2. Who would you have picked for this year's winner and why? 3. Did the Peace Prize happening in Oslo affect you in any way?

nobelpeaceprize2013, oslo, opcw, norway



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The 2013 Nobel Peace Prize: Five people relate their views

Published on Monday, 16th December, 2013 at 20:30 under the news category, by Merethe Ruud.
Last Updated on 16th December 2013 at 21:04.

OSLO: Hectic Nobel Peace Prize days are over. The Foreigner took a walk on main shopping street Karl Johan to ask people their experiences of the event and its happenings. The five interviewed either live or spent the week in Oslo.

OPCW's Ahmet Üzümcü arriving at parliament
President of Parliament Olemic Thommessen (third from left), received the laureates. Anniken Huitfeldt (second from L). OPCW DG Ahmet Üzümcü (fourth), Ambassador Olexandr Horin (5th), Geir Lundestad (last in queue).OPCW's Ahmet Üzümcü arriving at parliament
Photo: ©2013 Merethe Ruud/The Foreigner


All five were asked the following three questions:

1. Have you been following the Peace Prize celebration?
2. Who would you have picked for this year's winner and why?
3. Did the Peace Prize happening in Oslo affect you in any way?

Mayliss Meyer
Mayliss Meyer
©2013 Merethe Ruud/The Foreigner
Mayliss Meyer, Moss

“No. I don't really find it that interesting, but I would have picked the organization that won this year. I think it's a worthy winner. At the same time, I've stayed away from the centre of Oslo. So I haven't seen any of it.”

Astrid Køltzow, Oslo

Astrid Køltzow
Astrid Køltzow
©2013 Merethe Ruud/The Foreigner
Have you been following the Peace Prize celebration?

“Both yes and no, really. I've been working in the evenings this week. Therefore I missed out on watching both the ceremony and the concert on TV. I usually watch it, but this year I've just managed to follow the news in between work.”

Who would you have picked for this year's winner and why?

Malala Yousafzai excels. She's young and wise, perhaps a bit too young. Maybe she'll get the prize in a few years. I hope she manages to study. Her history is fantastic. She's an inspiration to the youth; well, to everybody.”

“The Peace Prize events didn’t really affect me, besides from the fact that I am very fond of Oslo. It's always gratifying when we can be proud of our city. I'm very proud of hosting the Nobel Peace Prize Ceremony,” said Ms Køltzow.Orhan Öztürk, an Oslo resident.

“I didn’t catch the Peace Prize this time. I'm studying to be an engineer and are in the middle of my exams now,” he explained. “I haven’t been much in the city centre as I’ve been busy at school.

“I would have picked Malala for this year’s winner, because she fights for women's rights and liberty in the Islamic cultures.”

Steinar Leite, Oslo

Steinar Leite
Steinar Leite
©2013 Merethe Ruud/The Foreigner
“I haven’t been following the Peace Prize celebrations a whole lot. I've been watching the TV and reading the papers, though. One must be updated with what's happening in the world,” Mr Leite said. “By the way, I've been following the discussion about maybe replacing the ex-politicians in the Nobel Peace Prize Committee. I think it might be a good idea if they looked in the right forums."

Who would you have picked for this year's winner and why?

“I've never thought about this. I've never been asked that question before! I have confidence in the committee do their job as best as they can.”

Did the Peace Prize happening in Oslo affect you in any way?

“No, the Christmas preparations have been in focus. I haven't seen any police or security in the streets.

Anne-Grete Olaussen
Anne-Grete Olaussen
©2013 Merethe Ruud/The Foreigner
Anne-Grete Olaussen, Oslo, told The Foreigner she has been following coverage of the Nobel Peace Prize a little on TV and in the papers.

“I'm very interested in the Peace Prize and especially who the committee chooses every year. I think they choose what is politically opportune. Last year's winner, the European Union, was strange and I think it reflects who is chairman of the committee.

She added that she “would have picked Malala for this year’s winner because her message is extremely important.”

“Girls in developing countries must be able to get an education. She is a role model for all the young people in the world.”

“The Peace Prize happening in Oslo didn’t really affect me in any way. I've seen police and security around in city centre, but it's not troublesome. However, I experience a police presence as being both natural and for protection for the people of Oslo following 2011’s July 22 attacks,” she concluded.

The Organisation for the Prevention of Chemical Weapons’ delegation had three days of unofficial and official program whilst in Oslo:

Monday December 9
1 pm: Press conference at The Nobel Institute.

Tuesday December 10
11 am: Save the Children's Peace Prize Party at Nobel Peace Center.
OPCW Director-General Ahmet Üzümcü attended this year's event called ‘No more bad chemistry’, together with 250 invited sixth graders. The party is an annual event planned, organized and carried out by children. 

Thorbjørn Jagland (L), Ahmet Üzümcü (R)
Thorbjørn Jagland (L), Ahmet Üzümcü (R)
©2013 Merethe Ruud/The Foreigner
1-2.15 pm: The Nobel Peace Prize Ceremony at Oslo City Hall.

5-6 pm: Live interview with CNN (Jonathan Mann) at Oslo City Hall.

7 pm: Torchlight procession and The Norwegian Nobel Committee's Banquet at Grand Hotel.

Eve of the Nobel Peace Prize banquet
Eve of the Nobel Peace Prize banquet
©2013 Merethe Ruud/The Foreigner
True to tradition, Nobel laureates greet a torchlight procession on Oslo's main street Karl Johan right before the banquet started. This is done from the balcony outside the Nobel Suite at the Grand Hotel.

Wednesday December 11

8.30-9.15 am: Breakfast meeting at the Grand Hotel.

Norway Conservative (H) Prime Minister Erna Solberg met with OPCW's Ahmet Üzümcü and Ukrainian ambassador Olexandr Horin. He is also a permanent representative of the OPCW.

10 am: At the Norwegian Parliament.

The president of the Parliament Olemic Thommessen, chair of the Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and Defence and Labour’s (Ap) former Culture Minister and Minister of Labour Anniken Huitfeld were amongst those who received the Nobel Laureate outside the Parliament.

OPCW DG Ahmet Üzümcü signs the protocol
OPCW DG Ahmet Üzümcü signs the protocol
Norwegian Parliament/Flickr
10.03-10.15 am: Protocol signing, Parliament.

The Laureate met members of the same Standing Committee, during which OPCW DGAhmet Üzümcü signed the protocol (pictures here – external link).

10.15-10.40 am: Interview with NRK.
NRK TV interview at the Parliament. Conversation between Ahmet Üzümcü, Olemic Thommessen and Anniken Huitfeldt, moderated OPCW DG Ahmet Üzümcü (L), Olemic Thommesen (R)
OPCW DG Ahmet Üzümcü (L), Olemic Thommesen (R)
Norwegian Parliament/Flickr
by the broadcaster’s news anchor Christian Borch. (Pictures: external link).

12-12.45 pm: Meeting with Norway’s Foreign Minister.The Nobel Laureate had a meeting with Minister of Foreign Affairs for the OPCW's Ahmet Üzümcü leaving parliament
OPCW's Ahmet Üzümcü leaving parliament
©2013 Merethe Ruud/The Foreigner
Conservative Party Børge Brende at the Ministry.

4.15-5.30 pm: Opening of The Nobel Peace Prize Exhibition.

This year's exhibition, ‘Combating Chemical Weapons’, is about the OPCW's work. Photographer  Paolo Pellegrin has followed OPCW's inspectors in their daily work (external link).

7.30-9 pm: The Nobel Peace Prize Concert at Oslo Spektrum.
Ahmet Üzümcü (L) and Scott Cairns
Ahmet Üzümcü (L) and Scott Cairns
©2013 Merethe Ruud/The Foreigner
The traditional annual concert featured various artists with different music styles, as is customary.

The audience had fun, which was obvious both by seeing and hearing they were enthusiastic throughout the concert. This was especially when the Oslo-based band Envy came on stage and also made their way out into the audience too.



Published on Monday, 16th December, 2013 at 20:30 under the news category, by Merethe Ruud.
Last updated on 16th December 2013 at 21:04.

This post has the following tags: nobelpeaceprize2013, oslo, opcw, norway.





  
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