Three women win 2011 Peace Prize / News / The Foreigner

Three women win 2011 Peace Prize. UPDATED: Norway’s Nobel Committee has awarded this year’s Peace Prize to Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Leymah Gbowee, and Tawakkul Karman. Dividing the award into three equal parts, committee leader Thorbjørn Jagland said it was given, “for their non-violent struggle for the safety of women and for women’s rights to full participation in peace-building work. We cannot achieve democracy and lasting peace in the world unless women obtain the same opportunities as men to influence developments at all levels of society.” 72-year-old Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, a Harvard-trained economist, is Africa’s first democratically elected female President. As well as boosting women’s position since her 2006 inauguration, she has been instrumental in securing peace in Liberia and furthering economic and social development.

nobelpeaceprize2011, thorbjoernjagland, nobelcommitteenorway



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Three women win 2011 Peace Prize

Published on Friday, 7th October, 2011 at 11:12 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 7th October 2011 at 12:56.

UPDATED: Norway’s Nobel Committee has awarded this year’s Peace Prize to Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Leymah Gbowee, and Tawakkul Karman.

Norwegian Nobel Institute, Oslo
Norwegian Nobel Institute, Oslo
Photo: © 2005-2007 Bjørn Erik Pedersen/W. Commo


Dividing the award into three equal parts, committee leader Thorbjørn Jagland said it was given, “for their non-violent struggle for the safety of women and for women’s rights to full participation in peace-building work. We cannot achieve democracy and lasting peace in the world unless women obtain the same opportunities as men to influence developments at all levels of society.”

72-year-old Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, a Harvard-trained economist, is Africa’s first democratically elected female President. As well as boosting women’s position since her 2006 inauguration, she has been instrumental in securing peace in Liberia and furthering economic and social development.

Peace activist, trauma counsellor and social worker Leymah Roberta Gbowee, is also from Liberia. She organised the Women of Liberian Mass Action for Peace, a non-violent group of Christian and Muslim women who protested against the country’s warlords wearing white T-shirts. Moreover, she helped bring the civil war to an end in 2003.  

Yemeni Tawakkul Karman, 32, heads the human rights group Women Journalists Without Chains (WJWC), and is one of the country’s most well-known and vociferous activists. She is also a member of a member of Islah, Yemen’s main Islamic Opposition Party.

The journalist was arrested in January this year in capital Sanaa at a protest that reportedly left one person dead and 20 detained. It followed earlier demonstrations that called, “on the Yemeni people to wage a revolution against their corrupt leaders. “We gathered to salute the Tunisian people,” she said to CNN at the time.

Upon being informed of the Nobel Committee’s decision, she told The Associated Press, "I am very, very happy about this prize. I give the prize to the youth of revolution in Yemen and the Yemeni people.”

Peace Research Institute Oslo (PRIO) Director Kristian Berg Harpviken, commented about this year’s award.

He told The Foreigner that, “this is a very important prize to the cause of women in peace processes. They are very worthy winners.”

“Nevertheless, it has been at the top of my agenda for the last three years, and I’m surprised it hasn’t come until now.”

Referring to previous, controversial decisions to award the Peace Prize to Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo last year, and President Barack Obama in 2009, Mr Berg Harpviken continued, “We won’t see anything equal to previous criticisms. The 2011 award fosters broad consensus.”

In its closing remarks, the Committee said it hoped “that the prize to Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Leymah Gbowee and Tawakkul Karman will help to bring an end to the suppression of women that still occurs in many countries, and to realise the great potential for democracy and peace that women can represent.”



Published on Friday, 7th October, 2011 at 11:12 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 7th October 2011 at 12:56.

This post has the following tags: nobelpeaceprize2011, thorbjoernjagland, nobelcommitteenorway.





  
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