Tourism and conservation to meet in the Arctic / News / The Foreigner

Tourism and conservation to meet in the Arctic. Scientists at a Norwegian climate centre have begun thinking differently, after a 600-foot thick block of ice about four times as big as Manhattan broke off from Greenland’s Petermann Glacier. "Today, we are seeing a much faster rate of iceberg calving than in previous years," said Peter Prokosch, Director of GRID-Arendal, a centre that collaborates with the UNEP (United Nations Environment Programme), monitoring changes in the Arctic. “Calving” is a very common phenomenon, but the size of this ice block was the largest single one for 50 years, GRID-Arendal reported last week.

petermann, glacier, arctic, calving, ice, block, break, grid-arendal, unep, norway, united, nations, environment, programme, peter, prokosch



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Tourism and conservation to meet in the Arctic

Published on Monday, 16th August, 2010 at 17:27 under the news category, by Ramona Tancau and Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 17th August 2010 at 09:02.

Scientists at a Norwegian climate centre have begun thinking differently, after a 600-foot thick block of ice about four times as big as Manhattan broke off from Greenland’s Petermann Glacier.

Ice calving from Hubbard Glacier, Alaska (Illus. photo)
Ice calving from Hubbard Glacier, Alaska (Illus. photo)
Photo: Alan Vernon/Flickr


"Today, we are seeing a much faster rate of iceberg calving than in previous years," said Peter Prokosch, Director of GRID-Arendal, a centre that collaborates with the UNEP (United Nations Environment Programme), monitoring changes in the Arctic.

“Calving” is a very common phenomenon, but the size of this ice block was the largest single one for 50 years, GRID-Arendal reported last week.

The Arctic sea is also experiencing a net ice loss, directly affecting polar bears and other species dependent upon ice.

A reduction of the ice surfaces also triggers less “white reflection” of solar energy, meaning increased regional warming.

July’s GRID-Arendal data revealed 70,000 square kilometers of ice is melting per day, meaning total ice cover in the Arctic is at its second lowest level for more than 30 years.

The centre also promotes conservation initiatives in the region, and its employees have come up with an idea to help preserve the Arctic’s unique habitats. They hope to develop a new kind of tourism.



Published on Monday, 16th August, 2010 at 17:27 under the news category, by Ramona Tancau and Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 17th August 2010 at 09:02.

This post has the following tags: petermann, glacier, arctic, calving, ice, block, break, grid-arendal, unep, norway, united, nations, environment, programme, peter, prokosch.





  
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