Traffic problems in Norwegian cities to increase / News / The Foreigner

Traffic problems in Norwegian cities to increase. Many of Norway’s cities can expect an increase in congestion over the next few decades, reports say. Non-government politicians admit they are also stuck in traffic. Capital Oslo could notice this in particular. The problem is unlikely to be solved quickly, especially at peak times. “There’ll be congestion and accessibility problems at peak times, both in Norway and elsewhere in the world. It’s like this all day in some parts,” the Norwegian Public Roads Administration’s (NPRA) Fredrik Lund told NRK.

norwaytraffic, transportnorway



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Traffic problems in Norwegian cities to increase

Published on Monday, 26th August, 2013 at 07:53 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith   .

Many of Norway’s cities can expect an increase in congestion over the next few decades, reports say. Non-government politicians admit they are also stuck in traffic.

LED traffic lights
LED traffic lights
Photo: Petey21/Wikimedia Commons


Capital Oslo could notice this in particular. The problem is unlikely to be solved quickly, especially at peak times.

“There’ll be congestion and accessibility problems at peak times, both in Norway and elsewhere in the world. It’s like this all day in some parts,” the Norwegian Public Roads Administration’s (NPRA) Fredrik Lund told NRK.

“We’re unable to answer 100 per cent as to what the situation will be, but there’ll be a lot of traffic on the roads, even though growth in passenger transport in metropolitan areas is intended handled by cycling, public transport, and walking. Business traffic will also probably increase.”

General election-oriented opposition politicians have various solutions.

Progress (FrP) wants to increase National Transport Plan allocations by NOK 455 billion (some USD 75.56 billion/EUR 56.46 billion/GBP 48.52 billion at today’s ROE).

Nevertheless, transport policy spokesperson Bård Hoksrud believes that it will take time for improvements to be seen,

“We need 10 years just to bring the decaying main road network up to scratch, 15 years for the county road network.”

Trond Helleland, Conservative (H) policy spokesperson, does not think the next 20 years will be sufficient to cut rush hour the traffic queues between Oslo and Drammen. His Party will be opting to strengthen the rail network, he said.

The Liberals’ (V) Ola Elvestuen also thinks weekdays without traffic will not happen.

Of a similar opinion, Knut Arild Hareide, leader of the Christian Democratic Party (KrF), informed NRK focusing on “public transport in and around the main cities will be the most important.”



Published on Monday, 26th August, 2013 at 07:53 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith   .

This post has the following tags: norwaytraffic, transportnorway.





  
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