Transport industry continues CO2 push / News / The Foreigner

Transport industry continues CO2 push. Several other transport companies announce their greenhouse gas emissions-busting moves. Stena Line has decided to convert its 240 metre long ferry Stena Germanica to run on methanol. It will be the first ship in the world to be powered by this. The project, which is expected to take place at the Remontova Shipyard in Poland, is in co-operation with engine manufacturer Wärtsilä.

co2, climatechange, globalwarming, greenhousegases, travel, environment



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Transport industry continues CO2 push

Published on Friday, 21st November, 2014 at 12:07 under the news category, by Sarah Bostock.
Last Updated on 21st November 2014 at 12:38.

Several other transport companies announce their greenhouse gas emissions-busting moves.

Earth
Various transport industry players are taking initiatives to reduce greenhouse gas emissions as global warming continues.Earth
Photo: NASA/Wikimedia Commons


Stena Line has decided to convert its 240 metre long ferry Stena Germanica to run on methanol. It will be the first ship in the world to be powered by this.

The project, which is expected to take place at the Remontova Shipyard in Poland, is in co-operation with engine manufacturer Wärtsilä.

The port of Gothenburg, the port of Kiel, and world methanol production and supply company major the Methanex Corporation are other partners.

Work on converting the Stena Germanica, scheduled for early 2015, is expected to take six weeks. The 1,500-passenger ferry sails between Gothenburg and Kiel.

The EU’s Motorways of the Sea initiative is supporting the project, expected to cost EUR 22m (some NOK 185m/USD 27.35m/GBP 17.46m at today's ROE) .

One of the intentions of Motorways of the Sea is to introduce new intermodal maritime-based logistic chains in Europe. The aim is to bring about structural change in transport, with more commercially efficient means of transport than road-only transport.

Stena Line CEO Carl-Johan Hagman comments that “we are constantly evaluating different fuels for the future and to be first in the world with a methanol conversion is a big step towards sustainable transportation.”

Finnish corporation Wärtsilä has developed the new engine conversion kit and ship application in co-operation with Stena Teknik. The engine will be dual fuel using methanol as the main fuel grade and Marine Gas Oil (MGO) as a backup reserve.

Using methanol will decrease sulphur emissions by around 99%, nitrogen by 60% and particles (PM) by 95% compared with today’s fuels. CO2 emissions will be reduced by 25%.

Methanol is a clear liquid chemical that is water soluble and readily biodegradable. From early 2015, vessels in the area around the Baltic and North Sea (known as the SECA AREA) will have to use fuel with very low sulphur content of 0.1%.

This follows 2008 legislative amendments to the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL) from 1973. It covers preventing ships polluting the marine environment.

2008’s amendment came after concerns were raised on the health impacts of sulphur on local populations.

The current restriction on sulphur content in fuel is 1.0%. Next year’s introduction of the amended legislation will mean the majority of ship operators will have to use more expensive distillate fuel (gas oil) with this lower 0.1% sulphur content.

Methanol is a clean-burning chemical, and can also be used for heating homes and cooking food.

Airline KLM also announces environmentally-friendly intentions. The company says that all flights from Oslo Gardermoen Airport will be 5% biofuel starting in 2015.

Biofuel will help reduce their greenhouse gas emissions and provide a more environmentally friendly means of air travel, according to the carrier.

“KLM are very proud to be part of the partnership between Statoil Fuel & Retail Aviation and SkyNRG, in efforts to make our industry more sustainable,” Welmar Blom, commercial manager for Europe and North Africa in the Air France KLM, said in a statement.

Last week, both SAS and Norwegian announced they were also considering adopting biofuel.



Published on Friday, 21st November, 2014 at 12:07 under the news category, by Sarah Bostock.
Last updated on 21st November 2014 at 12:38.

This post has the following tags: co2, climatechange, globalwarming, greenhousegases, travel, environment.





  
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