Treholt spy case investigator denies guilt / News / The Foreigner

Treholt spy case investigator denies guilt. A new book about convicted Norwegian spy Arne Treholt reveals that evidence police found in his apartment contains allegations it was fabricated. Former PST (Police Security Service) investigator Leif Karsten Hansen denies this. “These are serious allegations. We have told the Court of Appeal (Lagmannsretten) and the Supreme Court the truth when we submitted our evidence,” 72-year-old Hansen tells Aftenposten. Geir Selvik Malthe-Sørenssen and journalist Kjetil Bortelid Mæland, authors of the book “Forfalskningen – Politiets løgn i Treholt-Saken”, claim police tampered with Treholt’s attaché case.

arne, treholt, harald, stabell, spy, russia, money, payment, leif, karsten, hansen, helen, ster, case, review, reopen, police, security, service, pst



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Treholt spy case investigator denies guilt

Published on Friday, 10th September, 2010 at 15:30 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 19th September 2010 at 22:51.

A new book about convicted Norwegian spy Arne Treholt reveals that evidence police found in his apartment contains allegations it was fabricated. Former PST (Police Security Service) investigator Leif Karsten Hansen denies this.

Arne Treholt and Mohammed A. Radi, Athens, 1983
Arne Treholt and Mohammed A. Radi, Athens, 1983
Photo: Politiets sikkerhetstjeneste/Flickr


False

“These are serious allegations. We have told the Court of Appeal (Lagmannsretten) and the Supreme Court the truth when we submitted our evidence,” 72-year-old Hansen tells Aftenposten.

Geir Selvik Malthe-Sørenssen and journalist Kjetil Bortelid Mæland, authors of the book “Forfalskningen – Politiets løgn i Treholt-Saken”, claim police tampered with Treholt’s attaché case.

Authorities ransacked Treholt’s apartment in August 1983 and found the case, which contained several stacks of dollar bills that police allege was payment from the former Soviet republic. Pictures they took under the operation formed part of evidence used to convict him under his subsequent trial on charges of spying.

Time-lapse

However, negatives delivered to the authors last year by Treholt’s lawyer, Harald Stabell, show bits of tape that were part of the case’s latches. These were absent on pictures of the case taken by police. Photographic experts have told the authors they believe these were taken at a different time.

“One bit of tape has a matt finish, and there wouldn’t have been a reflection [as the photographs show] if it were there. It is not possible to recreate a reflection from a piece of tape,” Malthe-Sørenssen tells NRK.

The police pictures, released last month, also show some parquet flooring. But the authors allege this had not been put down until Christmas.

Dismissed

Treholt was convicted in 1985 and sentenced to 20 years in prison. He was pardoned in 1992.

There have been three attempts to get the case reopened by the Criminal Cases Review Commission (Gjenopptakelseskommisjonen) since then, most recently in 2008.

However, this third attempt was subsequently dismissed on the grounds of insufficient doubt as to the weakness of evidence against him. The CCRC was not aware of the tape on Treholt’s attaché case back then.

Optimistic

Stabell believes information contained in the book, which comes from an anonymous source, is sufficient to get Treholt’s case reopened again.

“We have documented false evidence was presented,” he says.

Helen Sæter, current head of the CCRC, says there is nothing to prevent the case being resumed once more.

“There are reasons to reopen it if what is contained in the book released [yesterday] is correct.”

Leif Karsten Hansen maintains his innocence, but Treholt himself is optimistic.

“I think the book is very well documented and believe the Norwegian authorities must take account of the information that has now been presented. It points quite clearly towards that the evidence has been fabricated,” he says.




Published on Friday, 10th September, 2010 at 15:30 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 19th September 2010 at 22:51.

This post has the following tags: arne, treholt, harald, stabell, spy, russia, money, payment, leif, karsten, hansen, helen, ster, case, review, reopen, police, security, service, pst.





  
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