Unique flowers receive bovine care / News / The Foreigner

Unique flowers receive bovine care. Norwegian Cows are on a heroic mission to save an extremely rare of orchid from extinction. The yellow-green orchid Honey Flower is under threat following its sudden decline from the Norway’s countryside. Whilst they were very common centuries ago, covering dozens of countries worldwide, including Norway, Norwegian nature experts have now raised the alarm over its decline. Places such as Asmaløy in Ytre Hvaler National Park are particularly affected

honeyflowerorchid, asmaloey, ytrehvalernationalpark



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Unique flowers receive bovine care

Published on Wednesday, 10th August, 2011 at 09:57 under the news category, by John Price   .
Last Updated on 10th August 2011 at 16:24.

Norwegian Cows are on a heroic mission to save an extremely rare of orchid from extinction.

Cows in a field
Cows in a field
Photo: ©2015 Michael Sandelson/The Foreigner


The yellow-green orchid Honey Flower is under threat following its sudden decline from the Norway’s countryside.

Whilst they were very common centuries ago, covering dozens of countries worldwide, including Norway, Norwegian nature experts have now raised the alarm over its decline. Places such as Asmaløy in Ytre Hvaler National Park are particularly affected

According to NRK, these flowers need to be taken great care of as getting them to take root and spread to new areas is considered difficult. Cows have now been called in to help save the orchids from extinction.

Ytre Hvaler National Park Manager Monika Olsen says the animals take their jobs very seriously.

“Their [cows’] assignment is to graze the area so the flower grows back here. This gives the small Honey Flowers favorable growth conditions,” she said.

“Asmaløy is an island of great biological diversity and many rare plants.”

Although the results from the last three years of this experiment are unclear, one landowner, Rigmor Johansen, is satisfied with bovines’ toil so far.

“The animals have done a very good job. The original landscape is returning, even if there is a way to go,” she said.

“The owner has hand-picked these cows because she knows that people can be confident in them. It’s important for walkers in the area the cows are well-behaved,” Ms Olsen added.



Published on Wednesday, 10th August, 2011 at 09:57 under the news category, by John Price   .
Last updated on 10th August 2011 at 16:24.

This post has the following tags: honeyflowerorchid, asmaloey, ytrehvalernationalpark.





  
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