Updated: Climate change could cause health problems / News / The Foreigner

Updated: Climate change could cause health problems. Scientists and Ministers of Health are looking into whether people’s health will be affected by climate change. During the annual conference on Arctic Frontiers, “Arctic Tipping Points”, taking place in Tromsø, Norwegian Foreign Minister Jonas Gahr Støre stated one of the main goals is to find solutions to climate change. “The scientific findings show that we may be at a tipping point. The annual mean temperature in the Arctic has been rising almost twice as quickly as in the rest of the world. We have witnessed the spectacular retreat and collapse of ice shelves,” he said in his speech yesterday.

jonasgahrstoere, arcticfrontiers, tromsoe, climatechange, icemelting, globalwarming, greenhousegases, co2



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Updated: Climate change could cause health problems

Published on Tuesday, 25th January, 2011 at 09:41 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Nicoleta Dumitrache Sincan   .
Last Updated on 26th January 2011 at 22:23.

Scientists and Ministers of Health are looking into whether people’s health will be affected by climate change.

Arctic Ocean off Tromsø
Arctic Ocean off Tromsø
Photo: Vinay Deep/Wikimedia Commons


During the annual conference on Arctic Frontiers, “Arctic Tipping Points”, taking place in Tromsø, Norwegian Foreign Minister Jonas Gahr Støre stated one of the main goals is to find solutions to climate change.

“The scientific findings show that we may be at a tipping point. The annual mean temperature in the Arctic has been rising almost twice as quickly as in the rest of the world. We have witnessed the spectacular retreat and collapse of ice shelves,” he said in his speech yesterday.

In August, a 600-foot thick block of ice about four times as big as Manhattan broke off from Greenland’s Petermann Glacier, the largest single “calving” incident for 50 years, according to scientists at the GRID-Arendal centre, monitoring changes in the Arctic.

Foreign Minister Støre also referred to last year’s Oslo Science Conference in Lillestrøm, highlighting one of the conclusions was “that we know quite a lot about the polar areas, but that we also need to bridge certain knowledge gaps.”

Ministers of Health and scientists at the Tromsø conference are concerned climate change could cause future health problems for the region, Norway, the Nordic Countries, and Russia.

“Climate change has an impact on infrastructure, and even more importantly, on the possibility of catching fish and seal, which are migrating to new areas in response to environmental changes. We also see increased concentration of mercury and more intense UV radiation in the Arctic, causing health challenges that must be taken seriously. The health of indigenous peoples in the Arctic is of course of importance. We should also bear in mind the challenges of indigenous peoples who – due to climate change – could be forced to change their way of life and adapt to a new environment,” said Minister Støre.

Ministers of Health are due to meet next month to take measures aimed at improving knowledge about future health problems.

“We know a lot about climate change but lack data on Arctic health,” Foreign Minister Jonas Gahr Støre tells Aftenposten.

There conference has over 1,000 delegates, and ends on Friday.




Published on Tuesday, 25th January, 2011 at 09:41 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Nicoleta Dumitrache Sincan   .
Last updated on 26th January 2011 at 22:23.

This post has the following tags: jonasgahrstoere, arcticfrontiers, tromsoe, climatechange, icemelting, globalwarming, greenhousegases, co2.





  
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