Updated: Iran ‘tried to buy Norwegian nuclear missile parts’ / News / The Foreigner

Updated: Iran ‘tried to buy Norwegian nuclear missile parts’. Police Security Service (PST) head Janne Kristiansen says Iran has tried to purchase Norwegian-made nuclear missile components for military use. Israeli paper Haaretz and Reuters report several companies selling "special components that can ... be used in weapons of mass destruction, for building missiles” have been approached by the Iranians, according to Ms Kristiansen. She believes Iran’s attempts have focused specifically on technology designed for civilian and military products, so-called ‘dual use’. This includes advance missiles manufactured for NATO navies and air forces in several countries by corporations, including Kongsberg Defence Systems.

pst, policesecurityservice, jannekristiansen, iran, nuclearmissile



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Updated: Iran ‘tried to buy Norwegian nuclear missile parts’

Published on Tuesday, 1st March, 2011 at 10:47 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 1st March 2011 at 22:43.

Police Security Service (PST) head Janne Kristiansen says Iran has tried to purchase Norwegian-made nuclear missile components for military use.

Nuclear missile launch (illus. photo)
Nuclear missile launch (illus. photo)
Photo: chb1848/Flickr


Pushy

Israeli paper Haaretz and Reuters report several companies selling "special components that can ... be used in weapons of mass destruction, for building missiles” have been approached by the Iranians, according to Ms Kristiansen.

She believes Iran’s attempts have focused specifically on technology designed for civilian and military products, so-called ‘dual use’. This includes advance missiles manufactured for NATO navies and air forces in several countries by corporations, including Kongsberg Defence Systems.

“Many (companies in Norway) supply missile technology [and] I am not pointing the finger at one,” she says.

Yesterday, the PST published its Annual Threat Assessment report. Although it does not refer to particular companies, or specifically missile technology in relation to Iran, the PST states, “the majority of the attempts can be traced to Iran. Iranian players have the capacity, intention and are extremely active in relation to the secret procurement of technology that is relevant to the development of a nuclear program. Requests by Iranian players for strategic goods and technology are expected to represent the greatest threat in relation to proliferation activities in Norway in 2011.

“Players who direct enquiries to Norwegian businesses use different methods and have in some instances displayed extremely aggressive behavior,” the report continues.

Last year, the UN Security Council passed a resolution for the most extensive sanctions against Iran to date, binding to all UN states including Norway.

Furthermore, without mentioning one particular country, the PST says some procurement activity is deliberately directed at small companies in Norway.

“These firms have as a rule had sound knowledge of possible loopholes and weaknesses in the Norwegian export rules and control mechanisms. We have also seen how small firms with decreasing business and liquidity issues can become potential targets for procurement agents. Such firms are in a vulnerable position and could potentially experience difficulties saying no to offers of lucrative contracts.”

A known issue

Meanwhile, Iran argues the parts are purely for producing electricity from nuclear power plants, but the West fears the country has military purposes in mind. The PST also writes it expects procurement trends to continue this year.

“During 2011 Norwegian businesses will continue to be targeted for the procurement of goods, know-how and technology that can be used in the development of weapons of mass destruction. Most of the procurement attempts can be traced back to Iranian players.”

Kongsberg Defence spokesperson, Ronny Lie, tells Haaretz/Reuters that the company "has been aware of the general problem for a long time", but that it has hundreds of suppliers.

"We are a large state-owned company that always follows a strict export regime in our dealing with other nations. I would assume Iran knows that. So that's why if they do make approaches it would probably be to small companies.”

According to Ms Kristiansen, the PST has not prosecuted any Norwegian company for deliberately contravening UN sanctions or export controls banning nuclear weapons-related technology being sold to Iran due to lack of evidence.



Published on Tuesday, 1st March, 2011 at 10:47 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 1st March 2011 at 22:43.

This post has the following tags: pst, policesecurityservice, jannekristiansen, iran, nuclearmissile.





  
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