Updated: Low immigrant voter turnout common in Norway / News / The Foreigner

Updated: Low immigrant voter turnout common in Norway. Immigrant voters are turning their backs on Norwegian polling booths because of little or no interest. Politicians have a job to do, according to researchers at the Institute for Social Research. Institute Director Ann-Helén Bay and senior researcher Johannes Bergh tell The Foreigner turnout rates go up as time goes by, but recent immigrants tend not to participate. Voting is often linked to socioeconomic status and integration into society. “Young voters generally participate less; the immigrant population is on average younger than the rest of the Norwegian electorate.”

immigrantvoters, norwegianpollingbooths, immigrationpolicy, ann-helnbay, johannesbergh, instituteforsocialresearch, instituttforsamfunnsforskning, kristiantrondstad, fafo



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Updated: Low immigrant voter turnout common in Norway

Published on Tuesday, 8th March, 2011 at 09:05 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 8th March 2011 at 18:25.

Immigrant voters are turning their backs on Norwegian polling booths because of little or no interest. Politicians have a job to do, according to researchers at the Institute for Social Research.

Norwegian ballot box
Norwegian ballot box
Photo: Lars Røed Hansen/Wikimedia Commons


Institute Director Ann-Helén Bay and senior researcher Johannes Bergh tell The Foreigner turnout rates go up as time goes by, but recent immigrants tend not to participate. Voting is often linked to socioeconomic status and integration into society.

“Young voters generally participate less; the immigrant population is on average younger than the rest of the Norwegian electorate.”

The low tendency is particularly common amongst people from Morocco, the former Yugoslavia, and Vietnam, whilst the figures are high for Pakistanis, Indians, and Sri Lankans.

Norway has more proactive policy of actively encouraging involvement in society than in most countries. The researchers believe minorities would participate more, politically, if there were an open labour market.

A recent report by Kristian Trondstad, researcher at independent foundation FAFO, shows only half of Norwegian businesses adhere to the government’s anti-discrimination law, requiring them to prevent discrimination based on immigrants’ ethnicity, skin colour, and religion.

Latest figures from Statistics Norway (SSB), show unemployment amongst immigrants is now at 7.1 percent. Norwegian employers also have a long history of xenophobia.

Ann-Helén Bay and Johannes Bergh suggest active minority politicians encouraging immigrants to take part in elections can achieve higher voter turnouts.

“When a minority candidate runs for office, minority voters turn out in higher numbers. Recruitment of minority politicians could therefore benefit minority turnout.”



Published on Tuesday, 8th March, 2011 at 09:05 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 8th March 2011 at 18:25.

This post has the following tags: immigrantvoters, norwegianpollingbooths, immigrationpolicy, ann-helnbay, johannesbergh, instituteforsocialresearch, instituttforsamfunnsforskning, kristiantrondstad, fafo.





  
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