Updated: Norwegian farmed salmon a swimming vegetable / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Updated: Norwegian farmed salmon a swimming vegetable. Fish farmers are combating the huge demand for Norwegian salmon by feeding it vegetarian food, according to a new NRK inquiry. Results show the farmed salmon’s diet is 70 percent vegetarian. This solution is cheaper and more accessible, making today’s aquaculture production much more efficient. Experts believe, consequently, that salmon is becoming a “virtual swimming vegetable”, with little Omega-3 content, while wild fish is healthiest due its fish diet.

omega3, farmedsalmon, salmonindustry, leroey, seafoods, ullevaaluniversityhospital



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Updated: Norwegian farmed salmon a swimming vegetable

Published on Wednesday, 2nd February, 2011 at 09:55 under the news category, by Nicoleta Dumitrache Sincan.
Last Updated on 2nd February 2011 at 12:28.

Fish farmers are combating the huge demand for Norwegian salmon by feeding it vegetarian food, according to a new NRK inquiry.



Results show the farmed salmon’s diet is 70 percent vegetarian. This solution is cheaper and more accessible, making today’s aquaculture production much more efficient.

Experts believe, consequently, that salmon is becoming a “virtual swimming vegetable”, with little Omega-3 content, while wild fish is healthiest due its fish diet.

Professor Harald Arnesen at Ullevål University Hospital studied the effects of salmon containing high and low levels of Omega-3 on cardiac patients, discovering that both sick and healthy people need the fatty acids.

“The weekly need for Omega-3 fatty acids might not be covered with today’s farmed salmon, even with two salmon dinners a week”, the professor tells NRK.

He also believes that scientists’ discovery could make customers feel a bit tricked, even though salmon is a healthy food.

NRK’s consumer inspectors (NRK Forbrukerinspektørene) sent salmon fillets from five major manufacturers for analysis to see how much omega-3 is contained in farmed and wild salmon. Both types look the same on sale, so people cannot notice the difference.

The test’s results show that the Omega-3 fatty acids have been more than halved due to the farmed salmon’s diet changes in the past ten years,.

Dr. philos Harold Sveier, Head of the Lerøy Seafood Group, believes these were conicidental.

“The raw vegetable materials are cheaper and more accessible than the marine food. This means that the final product contains less of the marine Omega-3 fatty acids. Yet, farmed salmon is a good Omega-3 source”.



Published on Wednesday, 2nd February, 2011 at 09:55 under the news category, by Nicoleta Dumitrache Sincan.
Last updated on 2nd February 2011 at 12:28.

This post has the following tags: omega3, farmedsalmon, salmonindustry, leroey, seafoods, ullevaaluniversityhospital.





  
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