Updated: Norwegian shoppers love cheap clothes / News / The Foreigner

Updated: Norwegian shoppers love cheap clothes. Imports of cheap Asian clothes have set new records in the past few years in what has become a traditional Norwegian shopping sport. Last year’s imports totaled 15 billion kroner, an increase of 870 million on the year before, according to the Federation of Norwegian Commercial and Service Enterprises (HSH). “Imports are increasing and prices are falling. Norwegians buy a lot of cheap clothes and get a lot for their money,” Bror William Stende, director of fashion and leisure for HSH, tells Aftenposten.

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Updated: Norwegian shoppers love cheap clothes

Published on Thursday, 3rd February, 2011 at 09:17 under the news category, by Nicoleta Madalina-Sincan.
Last Updated on 3rd February 2011 at 15:40.

Imports of cheap Asian clothes have set new records in the past few years in what has become a traditional Norwegian shopping sport.

Cool clothes 2
Cool clothes 2
Photo: s2art/Flickr


Last year’s imports totaled 15 billion kroner, an increase of 870 million on the year before, according to the Federation of Norwegian Commercial and Service Enterprises (HSH).

“Imports are increasing and prices are falling. Norwegians buy a lot of cheap clothes and get a lot for their money,” Bror William Stende, director of fashion and leisure for HSH, tells Aftenposten.

He explains that, “it is easy to find adequate clothing at a low price, and is so because people want to have different things to choose from”.

Annie Ørjasæter and her friends started importing clothes from Asia in 2002, and believes the business has been developing constantly since then. She now sells brands in 60 outlets in Norway.

Most of the clothes Ms Ørjasæter imported last year came from China, but she has also chosen Turkey in recent years because of its superior quality, the paper reports.

“Last year saw an upward curve in sales, and I also believe that more and more people are concerned about quality. However, we cannot compete with the chains in quantity or price,” she says.

Almost half of all clothes imported to Norway in 2010 came from China, with a noticeable increase for Malaysia, Vietnam, Sri Lanka and Bangladesh.

“Imports from China are still rising, but the clothing distributors try to look for suppliers in other low-cost countries because its economic growth and higher prices,” says Bror William Stende.

Ingun Grimstad Klepp, research director at the National Institute for Consumer Research (SIFO), believes Norwegians should be spending more money on quality goods. She claims their high standard of living makes them blind their unnecessarily overfilled wardrobes.

“We have learnt we should be frugal and economical, and this is interpreted as it is fitting to buy cheap. We can afford better,” she says.



Published on Thursday, 3rd February, 2011 at 09:17 under the news category, by Nicoleta Madalina-Sincan.
Last updated on 3rd February 2011 at 15:40.

This post has the following tags: cheap, clothes, imports, .





  
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