Updated: Norwegians losing ‘battle of the bulge’ / News / The Foreigner

Updated: Norwegians losing ‘battle of the bulge’. Norwegian men and children have become more obese because of an unhealthy diet and little physical activity. New figures from the Directorate of Health (Helsedirektoratet) show that 20.3 percent of Norwegian men aged 40-45 have a BMI (Body Mass Index) over 30, defining them as obese. “The picture is the same for all age groups, although the increase is slightly less among women, Deputy Director of Health Bjørn Guldvog tells Aftenposten.

obesity, overweight, fat, exercise, diet, bjoern, guldvog, directorateofhealth



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Updated: Norwegians losing ‘battle of the bulge’

Published on Friday, 11th February, 2011 at 09:58 under the news category, by Nicoleta Dumitrache Sincan.
Last Updated on 11th February 2011 at 20:16.

Norwegian men and children have become more obese because of an unhealthy diet and little physical activity.

Feet on scales
Feet on scales
Photo: Bill Branson,Nat.Cancer Inst./Wikimedia


New figures from the Directorate of Health (Helsedirektoratet) show that 20.3 percent of Norwegian men aged 40-45 have a BMI (Body Mass Index) over 30, defining them as obese.

“The picture is the same for all age groups, although the increase is slightly less among women, Deputy Director of Health Bjørn Guldvog tells Aftenposten.

Health authorities are concerned. 60-70 percent of people are overweight today. Obesity is common because people are less physically active than they used to be, but maintain the same eating habits.

Mr. Guldvog thinks developing more chronic, obesity-linked disorders will be more common in the future.

“Diabetes, an increase in cardiovascular disorders, and musculoskeletal problems are just some examples,” he says.

Figures are no better when it comes to children under 16. These teenagers spend up to approximately 40 hours a week in front of the computer and watching television. Only 8 percent of boys and 5 percent of girls have one hour of physical activity daily.

Moreover, 17.5 percent of women 40-45 are obese, which means that the statistics have doubled since 1994.

He believes the most important measure to counteract the negative trend, “would be more physical activity in schools. It should be easy to achieve, but so far, it has been a difficult goal to achieve, politically.”

“The negative effects will increase each decade if one is physically inactive when young. However, the chances of being more active later in life increase if one starts whilst young,” he adds.

Meanwhile, more effective healthcare methods have increased life expectancy in Norway. The mortality rate has decreased from 850 deaths per hundred thousand in 1980, to 565 in 2008.




Published on Friday, 11th February, 2011 at 09:58 under the news category, by Nicoleta Dumitrache Sincan.
Last updated on 11th February 2011 at 20:16.

This post has the following tags: obesity, overweight, fat, exercise, diet, bjoern, guldvog, directorateofhealth.





  
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