Utøya police operation condemnation continues / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Utøya police operation condemnation continues. Criticism of Norway’s police force in the aftermath of Anders Behring Breivik’s Utøya killing spree continues today despite authorities’ sidestepping efforts. Several eyewitnesses allege police could have approached the killer over half an hour earlier, with tens of other boats available instead of theirs, also censuring them for their choice of route. Buskerud District Police’s head of the operation to capture Breivik tried to fend off criticism last weekend, asking rhetorically, “should we have swum to Utøya?”

utoeyashootings, policehelicoptercriticism, andersbehringbreivik, oslobombing



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Utøya police operation condemnation continues

Published on Thursday, 11th August, 2011 at 09:29 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 11th August 2011 at 19:45.

Criticism of Norway’s police force in the aftermath of Anders Behring Breivik’s Utøya killing spree continues today despite authorities’ sidestepping efforts.



Several eyewitnesses allege police could have approached the killer over half an hour earlier, with tens of other boats available instead of theirs, also censuring them for their choice of route.

Buskerud District Police’s head of the operation to capture Breivik tried to fend off criticism last weekend, asking rhetorically, “should we have swum to Utøya?”

“There was no need to swim, there are many boats dotted around here, and people with access to them were at the quayside,” says one of the anonymous witnesses to Aftenposten.

One neighbouring cabin owner wonders what police were waiting for when they arrived, alleging the first lightly armed personnel “could have come over right away.”

The paper is doubtful that they could have survived, however, as there were rumours of more than one gunman, and Breivik had superior weapons. Inadequate training and procedures are also being blamed..

At yesterday’s press conference, police hit back at criticism over their failure to use helicopters in the early phases, with Minister of Justice Knut Storberget promising the independent “22 July” government-appointed commission would investigate this.

The first military Bell 412 helicopter was also not in the air until three-and-a-half hours after the bomb in Oslo went off. Army press spokesperson Eystein Kvarving admits that the fact that 3 of their 18 helicopters permanently stationed in Afghanistan “has clear consequences. The military’s helicopters could have supported incidents that have now been given lower priority.”

Christian Democratic Party (KrF) MP Einar Holstad says he is appalled at that senior Oslo police personnel claim their helicopter, which was grounded because of the summer holidays, would not have made a difference.

“It’s tragic to hear those people still thinking that Oslo police would not have made any difference if it had been airbourne,” he tells Dagsavisen today.



Published on Thursday, 11th August, 2011 at 09:29 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 11th August 2011 at 19:45.

This post has the following tags: utoeyashootings, policehelicoptercriticism, andersbehringbreivik, oslobombing.





  
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