Watch the Perseids from Norway / News / The Foreigner

Watch the Perseids from Norway. Meteor shower expected to reach its yearly maximum tonight. Earth is currently passing near to the trajectory of the Swift-Tuttle Comet. If you didn’t know already, August is a good month to observe meteor showers race across the heavens. Should you are lucky with the weather tonight and go out of town away from the lights, the Norwegian Space Centre says that you will be able to experience the spectacle as material from the Comet bores its way in to earth’s atmosphere at 60 kilometres per second.

swift-tuttle, meteor, shower, comet, norwegian, space, centre, perseids



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Watch the Perseids from Norway

Published on Wednesday, 12th August, 2009 at 21:08 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Meteor shower expected to reach its yearly maximum tonight.

Perseid shower meteors over Japan
Perseid shower meteors over Japan
Photo: Katsuhiro Mouri & Shuji Kobayashi


Earth is currently passing near to the trajectory of the Swift-Tuttle Comet. If you didn’t know already, August is a good month to observe meteor showers race across the heavens.

Should you are lucky with the weather tonight and go out of town away from the lights, the Norwegian Space Centre says that you will be able to experience the spectacle as material from the Comet bores its way in to earth’s atmosphere at 60 kilometres per second.

“You may be able to see over 100 meteors an hour,” says Pål Brekke, senior consultant at the Centre.

According to the Centre, it’s possible to observe this phenomenon between the end of July up to about 20 August if skies are clear, and you’ll be able to see even more this year if you are lucky.

“This year’s meteor shower can be more intense than in previous years as Earth is going to pass near the densest parts of the Comet’s trajectory,” Brekke says.

The Swift-Tuttle Comet was discovered in 1862 and uses approximately 130 years to orbit around the Sun.



Published on Wednesday, 12th August, 2009 at 21:08 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: swift-tuttle, meteor, shower, comet, norwegian, space, centre, perseids.





  
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