‘We can do even better,’ says Norway Education Minister / News / The Foreigner

‘We can do even better,’ says Norway Education Minister. Education Minister Kristin Halvorsen responds to results of yet another international survey citing Norway’s position among world academia and their institutions. Yesterday’s article on The Foreigner highlighted no Norwegian universities were amongst the top 100 in the new QS World University Rankings. The Socialist Left (SV) Minister has already called for a new whitepaper to reform Norway’s Higher Education sector.

norwayeducation, norwayuniversities



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS



News Article

LATEST:

}

‘We can do even better,’ says Norway Education Minister

Published on Tuesday, 14th May, 2013 at 10:09 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Education Minister Kristin Halvorsen responds to results of yet another international survey citing Norway’s position among world academia and their institutions.

Education Minister Kristin Halvorsen
Kristin Halvorsen at 2012's meeting of Ministers for Education and Research in Helsinki, FinlandEducation Minister Kristin Halvorsen
Photo: Seppo Samuli/Wikimedia Commons


Yesterday’s article on The Foreigner highlighted no Norwegian universities were amongst the top 100 in the new QS World University Rankings.

The Socialist Left (SV) Minister has already called for a new whitepaper to reform Norway’s Higher Education sector.

“QS is one out of many international university rankings. There are other rankings showing better results for Norwegian universities. On last year’s Shanghai-ranking the University of Oslo jumped from no. 75 to no. 67. A couple of years ago the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) became fourth best in the world on a ranking of university/business cooperation,” she writes in an email to The Foreigner.

“Rankings have obvious weaknesses, like differences in methodology, and they tend to exaggerate rather small differences between institutions. The fact that universities can jump up and down several places from year to year on the same ranking, undermines the reliability of the ranking results”, continues Mrs Halvorsen, “to build quality in universities is long-term work, and it is not likely that the picture changes so quickly.

“In Norway we have deliberately chosen not to build elite institutions. Rather we have concentrated our resources on top research groups through the Centres of Excellence scheme. The scheme has received good evaluation, and thirteen new centres were appointed a few months ago. Evaluations by international expert panels show that Norway has world class research groups over a broad range of disciplines,” the Education Minister adds.

“That said, we can do even better. We want our universities to become more profiled players on the international arena. The recent whitepaper on research states that we will benchmark our universities against top universities in the other Nordic countries,” Minister Halvorsen concludes.

Photo source.



Published on Tuesday, 14th May, 2013 at 10:09 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: norwayeducation, norwayuniversities.





  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!