West meets East in Norwegian Parliament / News / The Foreigner

West meets East in Norwegian Parliament. Politicians suggest state-funded Imam school to bridge the gap. Easter is over, and Islam is back on the political agenda. Two Liberal (V) politicians would like to see an Imam school opened in Norway.Strange Abid Raja and the Liberals’ Parliamentary Leader, Trine Skei Grande, believe there’s a need for Imams who have been raised within the Norwegian kindergarten system.

abid, raja, trine, skei, grande, venstre, liberal, party, islam, muslims, imams, schools, marianne, aasen, labour



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West meets East in Norwegian Parliament

Published on Tuesday, 6th April, 2010 at 07:45 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 6th April 2010 at 19:52.

Politicians suggest state-funded Imam school to bridge the gap.

Abid Raja and Trine Skei Grande
Raja: "Many think of an Imam as being a heavily bearded character."Abid Raja and Trine Skei Grande
Photo: Venstre/Flickr


Easter is over, and Islam is back on the political agenda. Two Liberal (V) politicians would like to see an Imam school opened in Norway.

Strange

Abid Raja and the Liberals’ Parliamentary Leader, Trine Skei Grande, believe there’s a need for Imams who have been raised within the Norwegian kindergarten system.

Raja argues this will both help Imams be part of the Norwegian public, and open up Muslim milieus to outsiders for the moment. Most are "imported" from either Saudi Arabia or Pakistan.

“Today, many think of an Imam as being a slightly strange, scary, heavily-bearded character who doesn’t speak Norwegian. It will also make it easier for people to understand and gain insight into what goes on in mosques,” he tells VG.

Irrelevant

The Liberal Party believes the school should be part of state financed University education, even though they are principally against mixing state and religion.

Skei Grande says this is the only way to go, however, reasoning that state-funded seminaries already exist. Seminaries are funded because there’s a state church.

But Marianne Aasen, head of the Parliamentary Education Committee for Labour (Ap), believes financing an Imam school isn’t a state matter.

“I think it would be completely inappropriate. It surprises me that the Liberal Party is even proposing it. If this really should become a matter for the state, we have to be consistent and provide for other religious leaders too, whether they are Buddhists, Sikhs, or Jehovah’s Witnesses,” she says.

Raja and Skei Grande will be putting the proposal forward at a Parliamentary session soon.



Published on Tuesday, 6th April, 2010 at 07:45 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 6th April 2010 at 19:52.

This post has the following tags: abid, raja, trine, skei, grande, venstre, liberal, party, islam, muslims, imams, schools, marianne, aasen, labour.





  
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