Where did you get that hat, you immigrant, you? / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Where did you get that hat, you immigrant, you?. EDITORIAL: Everyone has to wear a hat in life; be it to keep warm, stylish, superior, religious, protected, working, or discursive. Over half of Norwegians have recently said ‘genug ist genug’ to immigration, and the Press is not helping. Many Norwegian media sources tend to choose homogenous, almost suggestively superior language about particular nations, crime, social disadvantage, social dumping, begging, bogeymen, and benefits fraud when writing about immigrants. Recent press coverage in three major papers (Bergens Tidende, Dagens Næringsliv and Aftenposten, the latter having published results of the ‘stop the immigrants’ study), two tabloids (Dagbladet and VG), and a local (Trønder Avisa), confirms the trend.

immigrantsinnorway, foreignimmigration, integrationandassimilationinnorway



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Where did you get that hat, you immigrant, you?

Published on Wednesday, 13th July, 2011 at 15:12 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 15th July 2011 at 22:12.

EDITORIAL: Everyone has to wear a hat in life; be it to keep warm, stylish, superior, religious, protected, working, or discursive. Over half of Norwegians have recently said ‘genug ist genug’ to immigration, and the Press is not helping.



Many Norwegian media sources tend to choose homogenous, almost suggestively superior language about particular nations, crime, social disadvantage, social dumping, begging, bogeymen, and benefits fraud when writing about immigrants.

Recent press coverage in three major papers (Bergens Tidende, Dagens Næringsliv and Aftenposten, the latter having published results of the ‘stop the immigrants’ study), two tabloids (Dagbladet and VG), and a local (Trønder Avisa), confirms the trend.

Apparently, all immigrants are from India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Somalia, China, Vietnam, Eritrea, Iraq, with two of these nations being amongst the top five for crime, according to state number-cruncher Statistics Norway (SSB). Immigrants also drown because they cannot swim. They do not have to. ‘Immigrant’ in Norwegian is ‘innvandrer’, someone who ‘wanders in’, literally speaking.

Slightly older reports show journalists have written about Poles kidnapping (their own) children, and that Polish people cannot speak sufficient English or Norwegian to get or hold down a job despite Norway’s immense labour shortage, it seems. Non-Norwegian speakers cause integration worries in the workplace, Eastern Europeans (including Poles) in the Schengen also account for more crime, and foreigners are pushing Norwegians out of their districts.

For the linguistically-impaired Norwegian, broadcaster TV2 has used subtitles when foreigners are speaking perfectly good, intelligible Norwegian (even my Norwegian wife understands them, and she comes from a tiny farming community with a drawl), JUST TO EN-SURE VIEW-ERS UN-DER-STAND WHAT THEY ARE SA-YING. Foreigners are, after all, slow.

Articles about immigrants from Norway’s Nordic neighbours Denmark, Sweden, Finland and Iceland, and countries such as the US, Canada and the UK, on the other hand, are comparatively few.

Looking at these results, a possible explanation for the Norwegian Press’ insularism is hat envy brought on by a short tradition. Conventionally, the Hindus and Sikhs have turbans, Muslims have Hijabs, Burkas, and Niqabs, Jews use Kippahs, Catholic religious leaders don varying forms of hats, and some Orientals wear conical ones.

Whilst Norwegians, in a country that has only had its independence since 1905, only wear traditional hats when they use national costumes.

Hats on, gentlemen, please.



Published on Wednesday, 13th July, 2011 at 15:12 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 15th July 2011 at 22:12.

This post has the following tags: immigrantsinnorway, foreignimmigration, integrationandassimilationinnorway.





  
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