Wi-Fi better without Christmas fairy lights / News / The Foreigner

Wi-Fi better without Christmas fairy lights. Norway’s Communications Authority (NKOM) recommends pulling the plug to see if surfing improves. “The Authority’s very familiar with the well-known problem of radio interference from different lighting sources such as LED lighting and energy-saving bulbs etc.” Stavanger Aftenbladet quotes Head of Section, Per Eirik Heimdal as saying. It is not the actual LED lighting that is the problem, however, but a badly-shielded power supply with the same frequency as that of the household's wireless network.

wi-fi, christmas, internet, surfing, tablets, pc, mac, computers, laptops



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Wi-Fi better without Christmas fairy lights

Published on Tuesday, 8th December, 2015 at 21:40 under the news category, by Sarah Bostock.
Last Updated on 8th December 2015 at 21:52.

Norway’s Communications Authority (NKOM) recommends pulling the plug to see if surfing improves.

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Photo: Suzanne Tucker/Shutterstock Images


“The Authority’s very familiar with the well-known problem of radio interference from different lighting sources such as LED lighting and energy-saving bulbs etc.” Stavanger Aftenbladet quotes Head of Section, Per Eirik Heimdal as saying.

It is not the actual LED lighting that is the problem, however, but a badly-shielded power supply with the same frequency as that of the household's wireless network.

As well as changing frequencies, the Authority advises placing the lighting and router as far away from each other as possible.

Ofcom, the UK’s communications regulator, has also warned of the same issue.

It launched its Connected Nations 2015 report on 1st December, which gives information about telecoms and wireless networks.

It found that Wi-Fi speeds in up to six million homes and offices in the UK was not as fast as it could be.

“Wi-Fi uses electromagnetic waves to send information to and from your broadband router and device,” the regulator told The Inquirer, “so electrical devices cause small electromagnetic fields which can interfere with electromagnetic waves trying to travel through it.”

This is because Wi-Fi uses electromagnetic waves to send information to and from the broadband router and mobile or computer devices.

Other items than can affect or block signals are lights to microwave ovens, materials that absorb or deflect Wi-Fi such as a metal fridge, and water pipes – water absorbs transmissions.

“It [an inferior surfing speed] could be down to something as simple as interference from other electronic devices, such as a microwave oven, baby monitors, a lamp, or even Christmas fairy lights,” says Ofcom.

But while the Internet Service providers (ISPs) reportedly receive an increase in complaints about Wi-Fi performance over the Christmas season, fear not. Christmas trees are not considered dense enough to cause a real issue.



Published on Tuesday, 8th December, 2015 at 21:40 under the news category, by Sarah Bostock.
Last updated on 8th December 2015 at 21:52.

This post has the following tags: wi-fi, christmas, internet, surfing, tablets, pc, mac, computers, laptops.





  
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