World media pranks on 01st April / News / The Foreigner

World media pranks on 01st April. In the spirit of April Fools’ Day, media across the world published articles with potential to mislead. But which ones were true, which were hoaxes? Britain’s The Telegraph, Guardian and The Independent all had articles revolving around what would happen if Scotland would vote in favour of independence in 2015. The Telegraph said that Scottish politician Alex Salmond would replace Queen Elizabeth II on the new Scottish pound and The Guardian published that Scotland would switch to driving on the right if they were to become independent.

aprilfools, norway, media



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS



News Article

LATEST:

World media pranks on 01st April

Published on Wednesday, 2nd April, 2014 at 07:27 under the news category, by Manisha Choudhari.
Last Updated on 2nd April 2014 at 10:49.

In the spirit of April Fools’ Day, media across the world published articles with potential to mislead. But which ones were true, which were hoaxes?

A jester hat
A jester hat
Photo: Ed Schipul/Flickr


Britain’s The Telegraph, Guardian and The Independent all had articles revolving around what would happen if Scotland would vote in favour of independence in 2015.

The Telegraph said that Scottish politician Alex Salmond would replace Queen Elizabeth II on the new Scottish pound and The Guardian published that Scotland would switch to driving on the right if they were to become independent.

As for The Independent, their article was that ‘UN draws up peacekeeping plans in event of Scottish Yes Vote. The paper claimed that the UN was going to get involved in peacekeeping in case cross-border tensions would culminate in violence in the event of a ‘yes’ vote for Scottish independence.

The Mirror ran a story on how Kim Jong-Un has banned English-Irish band One Direction from North Korea unless they get haircuts. One ‘source’ asserted “our leader’s haircut is very particular, if you will. It might not be a voluminous as Harry Styles’ famous curls but Jong-Un doesn’t want his men to look like Marilyn Monroe”.

The Guardian Australia ran a story of how famed dessert, the ‘Lamington’, was actually created in New Zealand and is called a ‘Wellington’. This one appeared on Wikipedia, with the page for ‘Lamington’ quoting this article.

Also in Australia, Vegemite released a poster for a forthcoming energy drink, but later told their fans on Facebook “We won’t be swapping your Vegemite on toast for an energy drink anytime soon!”

And not only did they tell their customers that Chrome would soon offer services where websites could be translated into Emoji (ideograms of smileys used in Japanese electronic messages and webpages), Google also claimed they were on the lookout for a Pokémon master.

In the US, NPR ran a story to check whether or not their readers actually read the article, with a phony one appropriately titled, ‘Why Doesn’t America Read Anymore?’

European publication EurActiv teased their readers with news that European Commission president José Manuel Barroso has decided to run for a third term.

Norwegian media had several April 1st stories too. Radio channel P4 advised its listeners to honk more – for at least 25 seconds – as it could lead to lesser traffic queuing.

Broadcaster TV2 reported Scandinavian Airlines (SAS) announced that all passengers would have to take selfies whilst checking in and post them online in order to increase social media exposure.

Stavanger Aftenblad wrote that the speed limit on the E39 motorway would be reduced from 90 to 70 km/h.

Oslo Medical Association’s publication Fagbladet declared that Jens Stoltenberg is to become hospital director in the Norwegian capital until he starts his job as Secretary General of NATO on October 1st.

And last but not least, The Norwegian Language Council asked their readers to consider how many times they used the letters C, Q, X and Z, and proposed removing them entirely from Norwegian alphabet – perhaps more room for Æ, Ø, and Å, then?

Which stories that you read were your favourites? Why not comment, post of our Facebook page, or tweet on Twitter?



Published on Wednesday, 2nd April, 2014 at 07:27 under the news category, by Manisha Choudhari.
Last updated on 2nd April 2014 at 10:49.

This post has the following tags: aprilfools, norway, media.





  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!