Yemen political shift to bring Norwegian victim justice? / News / The Foreigner

Yemen political shift to bring Norwegian victim justice?. Yemeni civil unrest and political instability could open extradition doors to the UK for Farouk Abdulhak, accused of having raped and murdered Norwegian Martine Vik Magnussen. Whilst Britain has no extradition agreement with Yemen, with repeated attempts by UK authorities to cooperate with their Yemeni counterparts to bring Mr. Farouk Abdulhak in front of a British court and trying him for the rape and murder of Ms. Magnussen, this could all change. “We are in contact with the [non-violent, pro-democratic] revolutionary youth movement, and they have given us promises that they will deport Farouk if the President is ousted,” Mr. Marcus Roland of memorial fund “Justice for Martine” tells NRK.

martinevikmagnussenmurder, justiceformartine, faroukabdulhak, yemenprotests, presidentaliadbullahsaleh, shaherabdulhak



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Yemen political shift to bring Norwegian victim justice?

Published on Tuesday, 7th June, 2011 at 22:02 under the news category, by Ramona Tancau.

Yemeni civil unrest and political instability could open extradition doors to the UK for Farouk Abdulhak, accused of having raped and murdered Norwegian Martine Vik Magnussen.

Yemen March 01 protest
Yemen March 01 protest
Photo: Al Jazeera English/Flickr


Weakening protection

Whilst Britain has no extradition agreement with Yemen, with repeated attempts by UK authorities to cooperate with their Yemeni counterparts to bring Mr. Farouk Abdulhak in front of a British court and trying him for the rape and murder of Ms. Magnussen, this could all change.

“We are in contact with the [non-violent, pro-democratic] revolutionary youth movement, and they have given us promises that they will deport Farouk if the President is ousted,” Mr. Marcus Roland of memorial fund “Justice for Martine” tells NRK.

23-year-old Martine Vik Magnussen from Asker studied at Regents College in London and was last seen alive on March 14, 2008 after leaving a nightclub and getting into a cab with Farouk, the 21-year-old son of Yemeni billionaire businessman Shaher Abdulhak.

Her semi-naked body was found dumped two days later under a pile of rubble in front of the Central London luxury basement flat where Mr. Farouk Abdulhak lived.

By that time, the accused had already fled to Yemen, where his father Shaher Abdulhak offered him protection and a safe hiding place.

The Yemeni billionaire’s influence is tightly linked to President Ali Adbullah Saleh. A potential change on the political scene would leave Mr. Farouk Adbulhak exposed to justice, Mr. Roland believes.

“There are more opponents of the regime that support the Martine case who demand freedom and justice. It is no secret that President Saleh has long held a protective hand over Shaher and Farouk. Protection is substantially weakened or non-existent if the bond is broken.”

Fair trial

President Saleh’s removal from power after 33 years of rule is a feasible scenario as the wave of socio-political turmoil in Arab countries such as Tunisia and Egypt has now caught up with Yemen, according to Bloomberg Businessweek.

On June 6, Vice President Abduraboo Mansur Hadi took over governing responsibilities in Yemen while President Saleh received medical treatment in Saudi Arabia for his injuries, inflicted by a rocket striking his compound three days earlier.

While the Vice President argued he would only replace President Saleh temporarily until his return in “the coming days”, the Opposition perceives this transfer of power as a permanent handover.

“The departure of Saleh is a turning point not just for the Yemeni revolution but also is a huge push for the current changes in the Arab region and is the start of the real victory,” Zaki Bani Rusheid of the Muslim Brotherhood in Jordan tells Reuters.

Theodore Karasik, Director of the Institute for Near East and Gulf Military Analysis in Dubai, disagrees, however, highlighting that “It is premature to say that he [President Saleh] is completely out of the picture.

“He left for medical reasons, not political, and there is a big difference between the two. The family members that remained in the country appear to be the ones that make the regime function,” Bloomberg Businessweek reports him as saying.

Meanwhile, the “Justice for Martine” memorial foundation does not have any political interest in the affairs of Yemen, despite its active involvement with informing Yemeni people of Ms. Magnussen’s violent death and the country’s double standard practices.

Mr. Marcus Roland tells NRK, “We only have one goal, and it is to get Farouk tried in a British court. It is important to clarify the question of guilt and that it happens in the country where the crime took place. It is also important that he is tried in a court without the risk of capital punishment.”




Published on Tuesday, 7th June, 2011 at 22:02 under the news category, by Ramona Tancau.

This post has the following tags: martinevikmagnussenmurder, justiceformartine, faroukabdulhak, yemenprotests, presidentaliadbullahsaleh, shaherabdulhak.


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