Live mines could stop Norwegian-Russian crossing point / News in brief / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Live mines could stop Norwegian-Russian crossing point. A new expensive border station in Finnmark, northern Norway, may not be built as the there are still large amounts of armed devices, reports say. The undetonated explosives below ground, one of which a local man said was up to 300 kilos, stem from German soldiers’ mining the area as the Russians pressed forward in 1994. Some bombs dropped by aircraft remain unexploded as well, reports NRK. According to landowner Ørjan Nilsen, an anti-tank mine killed a man in a bulldozer when he was working, and in a separate incident many years ago, an anti-personnel mine blew the front off a lorry.

norwayrussiaborder, borderstationexplosives



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23:27:37 — Tuesday, 16th September, 2014

News in brief Article

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Live mines could stop Norwegian-Russian crossing point

Published on Tuesday, 4th September, 2012 at 13:42 under the news in brief category, by Nicoleta Dumitrache Sincan.

A new expensive border station in Finnmark, northern Norway, may not be built as the there are still large amounts of armed devices, reports say.



The undetonated explosives below ground, one of which a local man said was up to 300 kilos, stem from German soldiers’ mining the area as the Russians pressed forward in 1994. Some bombs dropped by aircraft remain unexploded as well, reports NRK.

According to landowner Ørjan Nilsen, an anti-tank mine killed a man in a bulldozer when he was working, and in a separate incident many years ago, an anti-personnel mine blew the front off a lorry.

Local police superintendant Stein Hansen told the broadcaster, “We cannot know what amounts of and exactly what kind of explosives we are talking about, but it looks like there are remnants from World War II.”

Rising construction costs for new customs, police, and food authority buildings because of having to use remote-controlled machinery have also blown the budget.

“I’m not an explosives expert, but I would have thought that a machine prodding around an undetonated bomb would have consequences,” officer Hansen concluded.



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Published on Tuesday, 4th September, 2012 at 13:42 under the news in brief category, by Nicoleta Dumitrache Sincan.

This post has the following tags: norwayrussiaborder, borderstationexplosives.


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