More Norwegians leaving Oslo / News / The Foreigner

More Norwegians leaving Oslo. Ethnic Norwegians are increasingly leaving several parts of Oslo, a Statistics Norway report has revealed. The SSB inquiry, which covers the years 1999 to 2010, relates that about 1,700 Norwegians left the eastern and southern suburbs of the capital during that period. Most of the people who moved these areas originate from Eastern Europe or the “the rest of the world”, meaning Asia, Africa, South-America and Oceania, minus Australia and New Zeeland.

oslopopulation, norwayforeigners



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14:45:08 — Saturday, 1st November, 2014

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More Norwegians leaving Oslo

Published on Monday, 25th March, 2013 at 07:30 under the news category, by Asgeir Ueland.
Last Updated on 25th March 2013 at 08:39.

Ethnic Norwegians are increasingly leaving several parts of Oslo, a Statistics Norway report has revealed.

Oslo skyline
Oslo skyline
Photo: Inez Dawczyk/The Foreigner


The SSB inquiry, which covers the years 1999 to 2010, relates that about 1,700 Norwegians left the eastern and southern suburbs of the capital during that period.

Most of the people who moved these areas originate from Eastern Europe or the “the rest of the world”, meaning Asia, Africa, South-America and Oceania, minus Australia and New Zeeland.

There was also an overall leak to Akershus County northeast of Oslo during the period, with the groups of people moving here mostly coming from other places in Norway, or Western Europe, the US, Canada, Australia and New Zealand.

At the same time, the overall population in Oslo increased due to immigration. There was also greater movement from inner parts of the city from West to East, but much of this is attributed to a young population who move to and from the city.

The trends the state number cruncher presented are not new, however. There have been similar reports in the Norwegian media over the last years, implying a more segregated Oslo, in particular in its outer parts.

Oslo’s population rose from 529,846 in 2004 to 599,230 in 2010. But the two last years have seen a lesser growth than the peak year in 2008, when the population rose by 15,000 people.



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Published on Monday, 25th March, 2013 at 07:30 under the news category, by Asgeir Ueland.
Last updated on 25th March 2013 at 08:39.

This post has the following tags: oslopopulation, norwayforeigners.


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