A narrow ski victory for Norway on Valentine’s Day / Columns / The Foreigner

A narrow ski victory for Norway on Valentine’s Day. The Scandinavian country is known for its superior ski sporting victories, but did not conquer the slopes in Czechoslovakia in the first quarter of the 20th Century. 14th February 1925 saw the first Nordic World Ski Championship held in Janské Lázně (Johannisbad in Germany) in the former Czechoslovakia (now the Czech Republic). The International Ski Federation (FIS), the biggest governing body for International sports, only allowed male participants in those days. Women only began participating some 29 years later.

skiing, fis, sports, paywall



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A narrow ski victory for Norway on Valentine’s Day

Published on Sunday, 14th February, 2016 at 21:48 under the columns category, by Sarah Bostock.

The Scandinavian country is known for its superior ski sporting victories, but did not conquer the slopes in Czechoslovakia in the first quarter of the 20th Century.

Skis
Skis
Photo: Wokandapix/Public Domain


14th February 1925 saw the first Nordic World Ski Championship held in Janské Lázně (Johannisbad in Germany) in the former Czechoslovakia (now the Czech Republic).

The International Ski Federation (FIS), the biggest governing body for International sports, only allowed male participants in those days. Women only began participating some 29 years later.

While Czechoslovakia came first in the rankings with ten medals, winning four Golds, three Silvers, and three Bronzes, Norway had to settle for second place with just one.  

It was Henry Ljungmann who prevented Norway from going home empty-handed, winning Silver in Ski Jumping with 18,444 points for the event on 12th February.

And perhaps uncharacteristically in comparison to present-day, only two Norwegians competed at the event.

Compatriot Johan Blomseth (b. 2nd February 1897 in Eastern Norway’s Nittedal municipality, d. 7th September 1959 in Vienna) came 6th in the 18km Combined.

Ljungmann, born on 3rd December 1897 (date of death unknown) in Kristiania (now Oslo), also set a ski jumping record in Garmisch Partenkirchen’s Kochelberg (Bavaria), measured to be 59.5 metres (some 195 feet). He also became Norway’s champion in single scull rowing in 1924.

Since that time, Norway has won 126 Golds, 98 Silvers, and 100 Bronzes in World Ski Championships (as of 2015).



Published on Sunday, 14th February, 2016 at 21:48 under the columns category, by Sarah Bostock.

This post has the following tags: skiing, fis, sports, paywall.





  
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