Norway and Brazil face similar challenges / Columns / The Foreigner

Norway and Brazil face similar challenges. Nearly ten thousand kilometres from Longyearbyen, in the middle of the Atlantic, sits the gorgeous island group of Fernando de Noronha, Brazil. Being just south of the equator, Fernando de Noronha has a rather different climate to Svalbard, yet intriguing sustainability parallels emerge between the two archipelagos. Early in June, I was fortunate to travel to Fernando de Noronha for a conference on island cultures. Island music, language, and literature were amongst the presentations--alongside the viability of island life.  Two Fernando de Noronha residents lamented how four-fifths of the archipelago's food is imported. They demonstrated local production with their own backyard garden while detailing how permaculture could readily be implemented.

norway, brazil, climate



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS



Columns Article

LATEST:

}

Norway and Brazil face similar challenges

Published on Sunday, 13th July, 2014 at 11:01 under the columns category, by Ilan Kelman.

Nearly ten thousand kilometres from Longyearbyen, in the middle of the Atlantic, sits the gorgeous island group of Fernando de Noronha, Brazil. Being just south of the equator, Fernando de Noronha has a rather different climate to Svalbard, yet intriguing sustainability parallels emerge between the two archipelagos.

Cultivating food
Using rubbish to grow food on Fernando de Noronha, Brazil.Cultivating food
Photo: Ilan Kelman


Early in June, I was fortunate to travel to Fernando de Noronha for a conference on island cultures. Island music, language, and literature were amongst the presentations--alongside the viability of island life. 

Two Fernando de Noronha residents lamented how four-fifths of the archipelago's food is imported. They demonstrated local production with their own backyard garden while detailing how permaculture could readily be implemented.

Such permaculture would reduce waste by growing fruits and vegetables in throw-away objects. Since two-fifths of the solid waste produced on-island is currently organics, significant scope exists for composting.

In the tropics, fans and air conditioning are common--and suck up energy. In one house, simple modifications increased the living space and introduced natural ventilation. Repeating that across the island would increase comfort and reduce environmental impact.

Meanwhile, the desire for tourism brings easy, short-term cash, yet tourists tend to use many more resources than locals while generating more waste. Balancing the income from tourists with the costs of hosting them is an eternal debate.

These struggles manifest on Svalbard--at times with matching efforts in response! Polar permaculture and natural ventilation during bitterly cold winters are exciting research areas.

Which led to one conclusion from the conference: No matter the climate, location, or environment, island communities around the world can face similar sustainability challenges and solutions.

Ilan Kelman is a Reader in Risk, Resilience and Global Health at University College London and an active island sustainability researcher.



Published on Sunday, 13th July, 2014 at 11:01 under the columns category, by Ilan Kelman.

This post has the following tags: norway, brazil, climate.





  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!