Norway, islands in the sun, and climate change education / Columns / The Foreigner

Norway, islands in the sun, and climate change education. COMMENTARY: How is Norway linked with tropical islands other than as tourist holiday spots? I have just returned from a United Nations meeting in the Bahamas on climate change education for small island countries. As a scientist based in Norway I represented Many Strong Voices, a Norway-funded initiative which works with islanders and Arctic peoples to help themselves for climate change. The islanders are trying their best to control their own fate, and the presentations and discussions were inspiring. These demonstrated the creativity islanders bring to tackling the challenges they face.

climatechange, c02emissions



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS



Columns Article

LATEST:

Norway, islands in the sun, and climate change education

Published on Wednesday, 5th October, 2011 at 09:51 under the columns category, by Ilan Kelman.

COMMENTARY: How is Norway linked with tropical islands other than as tourist holiday spots?

Anse Source d'Argent, La Digue, Seychelles
Anse Source d'Argent, La Digue, Seychelles
Photo: rachel_thecat/Flickr


I have just returned from a United Nations meeting in the Bahamas on climate change education for small island countries. As a scientist based in Norway I represented Many Strong Voices, a Norway-funded initiative which works with islanders and Arctic peoples to help themselves for climate change.

The islanders are trying their best to control their own fate, and the presentations and discussions were inspiring. These demonstrated the creativity islanders bring to tackling the challenges they face.

A teacher on one Bahamian island has set up school gardens, growing vegetables for the community while stabilising the eroding beach. In the middle of the Pacific, Cook Islands pupils learn about their environment's fragility by participating in conservation projects.

University courses are being developed in the Seychelles to teach the locals what is needed for their own country. Meanwhile, a small island university consortium is developing distance-learning degrees on small island development.

The charity Sandwatch is inspiring a generation of island schoolchildren to keep their coastlines healthy around the world. When the students become decision and policy makers, hopefully their experiences will lead to better development decisions than in the past.

Even with many polluting countries failing to take serious action to stop climate change and its worst impacts, all this work proceeds. The islanders have now moved beyond the blame game and are seeking positive action, to lead the world regarding climate change education and responses.

We discussed the irony of the meeting's costs, taking the opportunity to create numerous initiatives for collaborating without travel.

I can sit at my desk in Norway learning from, and contributing to the islanders in the sun--hoping that the island peoples and communities will continue to thrive while contributing to creating a sustainable world, despite climate change.

But we should always consider if these activities must use the excessive energy for flying to a holiday destination.

Dr. Ilan Kelman is a Senior Research Fellow at the Center for International Climate and Environmental Research - Oslo (CICERO).



Published on Wednesday, 5th October, 2011 at 09:51 under the columns category, by Ilan Kelman.

This post has the following tags: climatechange, c02emissions.





  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!