Human anatomy displayed in mid-Norway / Entertainment / The Foreigner

Human anatomy displayed in mid-Norway. Gunther von Hagen’s stark “Body Worlds Vital” work will show dead bodies at an exhibition in at the University of Trondheim’s Science Museum. It is the first time it has ever been put on in Norway. The German anatomist’s creation is intended to celebrate both the body’s movement and its potential. It is achieved via aesthetic presentations of the body’s form and complex functions. “We’re getting 13 complete bodies in various poses, ranging from the chess player to the skier,” museum director Reidar Andersen told NRK. “There are also hundreds of organs.”

art, anatomy, exhibition, plastination, preservation, human, body, science, paywall



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Human anatomy displayed in mid-Norway

Published on Monday, 21st November, 2016 at 19:04 under the entertainment category, by Charlotte Bryan.
Last Updated on 21st November 2016 at 19:15.

Gunther von Hagen’s stark “Body Worlds Vital” work will show dead bodies at an exhibition in at the University of Trondheim’s Science Museum. It is the first time it has ever been put on in Norway.

The Chess Player, Body Worlds Vital
Gunther von Hagens' BODY WORLDS, Institute for Plastination, Heidelberg, GermanyThe Chess Player, Body Worlds Vital
Photo: Gunther von Hagens' BODY WORLDS


The German anatomist’s creation is intended to celebrate both the body’s movement and its potential. It is achieved via aesthetic presentations of the body’s form and complex functions.

“We’re getting 13 complete bodies in various poses, ranging from the chess player to the skier,” museum director Reidar Andersen told NRK. “There are also hundreds of organs.”

Travelling exhibition “Body Worlds Vital” has been displayed in over 100 cities worldwide, including Tokyo, New York, Los Angeles and Mexico City.  

It shows the human body in states of well-being, pain, and illness with the help of authentic human organs and multimedia.

Displays will consist of dead bodies preserved by Gunther von Hagen (born in 1945 in Poland), who invented the technique of preservation of biological tissue – called Plastination.

"The deceased body is embalmed with a formalin injection to the arteries, while smaller specimens are immersed in formalin. After dissection, all bodily fluids and soluble fat in the specimens are then extracted and replaced through vacuum-forced impregnation with reactive resins and elastomers such as silicon rubber and epoxy,” Gunther von Hagen told website bodyworlds.com.

First shown in 1995, the exhibition has been seen by over 40 million people. Reidar Andersen at the museum in Sør-Trøndelag County commented to NRK that he is aware of the reaction the exhibition may cause.

“There are of course some who think it is macabre. The first thing we thought before we saw it was: is this is a bit on the edge? And the answer was no.” BODY WORLDS exhibitions are currently showing in America, Africa, Asia, and Europe.

Mr Andersen hopes that von Hagen’s creation will bring educational benefits to others than just the medical students in Norway who will view it.

“One can learn a lot about health by seeing it. For example, you can compare a liver from someone who has been drinking a lot of alcohol with a fresh one.”

Body Worlds Vital will be on display at the University’s Science Museum between 6th June and 8th October 2017.

"The human body is the last remaining nature in a manmade environment. I hope for the exhibitions to be places of enlightenment and contemplation, even of philosophical and religious self-recognition, and open to interpretation regardless of the background and philosophy of life of the viewer,” Gunther von Hagen also explained to bodyworlds.com.



Published on Monday, 21st November, 2016 at 19:04 under the entertainment category, by Charlotte Bryan.
Last updated on 21st November 2016 at 19:15.

This post has the following tags: art, anatomy, exhibition, plastination, preservation, human, body, science, paywall.





  
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