Nordic skills: How to cope with a long winter / Entertainment / The Foreigner

Nordic skills: How to cope with a long winter. Nordic skating, also known as Swedish skating (långfärdsskridsko), is a recreational type of skating on natural ice that is becoming increasingly popular. The whole family, regardless of age, can do this. The pursuit uses long distance ice skates. These differ from the regular ones by being more stable, enabling you to go mile after mile – preferably with the sun on your face and the wind in your back. The skatesTove AnderssonThese skates, typically with blades that are 46 or 51 centimetres long, make tracks on waters covered with a thick layer of ice, some of these being miles long. The shoe is secured by a hoop in front and a strap behind the skate.

skating, winter, nordic, paywall



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Nordic skills: How to cope with a long winter

Published on Sunday, 15th February, 2015 at 09:26 under the entertainment category, by Tove Andersson.

Nordic skating, also known as Swedish skating (långfärdsskridsko), is a recreational type of skating on natural ice that is becoming increasingly popular.

Nordic skating
Poeple on a frozen stretch of water going Nordic skating. It is sometimes referred to as Swedish, tour, or wild skating. Nordic skating
Photo: Tove Andersson


The whole family, regardless of age, can do this. The pursuit uses long distance ice skates. These differ from the regular ones by being more stable, enabling you to go mile after mile – preferably with the sun on your face and the wind in your back.

The skates
The skates
Tove Andersson
These skates, typically with blades that are 46 or 51 centimetres long, make tracks on waters covered with a thick layer of ice, some of these being miles long. The shoe is secured by a hoop in front and a strap behind the skate.

The Swedish skates are a Swedish innovation. They are not composed of a shoe and blade like traditional ones, but bindings and stainless steel. One type uses mountain or winter shoes. Boots should be fairly stiff and provide good support around the ankles.

There are many agencies in Sweden around the country that hire out these types of skates, but 2014 was the first year in which marked interest for these was registered in Norway.

Norwegian fjords, such as Buskerud County’s Tyrifjorden and Holsfjorden, are famous for places to skate. But Krøderen, also located there, as well as Østfold County’s Vansjø, are now being used too.

Even with little training, people come out in the bright winter sun. Skating depends on the roughness of the ice, the design of the ice skate, and the skill and experience of the skater.

Ice thickness can vary
Ice thickness can vary
Tove Andersson
But skating on ice is always a risk, so bringing safety equipment is necessary. Experienced skaters advise people to always bring ice claws - a pair of metal spikes with handles for hauling yourself out of holes in the ice if an accident occurs.

A line and something to test the thickness of the ice are also needed. Moreover, climbing out of the water back onto the ice due to the ice repeatedly breaking is difficult, so most people skate in pairs or with family and friends.

And while people skating outdoors will often share their tips on safety, the Norwegian Skiing Association (Skiforeningen) has a Facebook page with advice about icy water and safety.

Facts:

  • Nordic/Swedish skating is sometimes referred to as tour skating, or wild skating.
  • Skating as a sport is not new. The University of Oxford suggests that the earliest ice skating happened in southern Finland more than 3,000 years ago.


Published on Sunday, 15th February, 2015 at 09:26 under the entertainment category, by Tove Andersson.

This post has the following tags: skating, winter, nordic, paywall.





  
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