Visit modern Vikings in Lofoten / Entertainment / The Foreigner

Visit modern Vikings in Lofoten. People wishing to see how the Vikings used to live have the opportunity this week in the Northern Norway archipelago. The Lofotr Viking Festival in Nordland County is being arranged for the 10th time this year. It is situated in beautiful Lofoten on the island of Vestvågøy.  For five days, visitors can learn about Viking history, participate in activities like rowing, shooting with a bow and arrow, dressing in Viking clothing, and drinking mead. “We’re about 150 this year,” Tove Anita Olsen, one of the Vikings, tells The Foreigner.

vikings, norway, festival



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Visit modern Vikings in Lofoten

Published on Monday, 4th August, 2014 at 22:43 under the entertainment category, by Tove Andersson.

People wishing to see how the Vikings used to live have the opportunity this week in the Northern Norway archipelago.

A woman at Borg
A woman at Borg
Photo: Kjell Ove Storvik/Lofotr Viking Museum


The Lofotr Viking Festival in Nordland County is being arranged for the 10th time this year. It is situated in beautiful Lofoten on the island of Vestvågøy.  For five days, visitors can learn about Viking history, participate in activities like rowing, shooting with a bow and arrow, dressing in Viking clothing, and drinking mead.

“We’re about 150 this year,” Tove Anita Olsen, one of the Vikings, tells The Foreigner.

She first participated as a völva ten years ago. A völva is an Old Norse word vǫlr for a fortune teller, a sorceress, but also means a source of wisdom, a traveling teacher.

The festival surroundings, with their authentic buildings and breathtaking nature, add to exciting experiences, eye to eye with the Vikings.

The event is held in Lofotr Viking Muesum in Borg. Borg was a powerful center for hundreds of years in the Early Iron Age (500-1030 AD in Norway).

Upon entering the Viking Chieftain´s house built in 500 AD, visitors step back more than a thousand years. 

According to Viking Museum staff, “the festival’s main goal is to share the history of the Norwegian Viking Age, in an engaging way for our participants and visitors. Vikings from Norway and abroad conquer the festival area, participating in and organizing concerts, markets, theater performances, fighting shows, games, competitions, handicraft demonstrations, workshops of many kinds – and more.”

Storytelling is also part of the program, with The Troll King’s Story being told in English after the opening ceremony. The Viking world view as a family theater play, facts about Viking music for children, and telling of Odin´s offerings are also some of the exciting parts of the program.

In real life, Tove Anita Olsen is an art therapist graduate from the Danish Institute for Art Therapy.

“I give hand and neck massage, blend oils and creams and interpret dreams,” she says.

Ms Olsen also offers advice from Odin on what to focus on to make the best choices in life, here and now.

What do you think about being a woman during the Viking Era?

“The Viking völve had a unique position, independent, a little outside what we typically understand by gender in my opinion,” Tove Anita remarks.

The festival is visited by 5000-5,500 during its five-day run, and Vikings arrive from many countries. Some recreate elements from the Viking Era as a hobby, such as local handicraft. 

“Exhibitors at the market sell items including ceramics, wood, metal, jewelry, fur, and leather.  The festival aims to convey the Viking era in a vibrant, engaging and entertaining way. Guests are welcome to try their hand at various activities, such as rowing on a Viking ship, and axe-throwing,” explains Lofotr Viking Museum Marketing Director Anita Eilertsen.

The Lofotr Viking Festival takes place between the 6th and 10th of August. Details of how to get there can be found here.



Published on Monday, 4th August, 2014 at 22:43 under the entertainment category, by Tove Andersson.

This post has the following tags: vikings, norway, festival.





  
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