Visiting wolves and churches in Northern Norway / Entertainment / The Foreigner

Visiting wolves and churches in Northern Norway. Hotels may offer the all-inclusive breakfast and additional tours, but what you won’t find is the chance to live and sleep amongst wolves. Troms County also offers a listed church. Located in Bardu (Northern Sámi: Bearddu suohkan, Kvensk: Perttulan komuuni) between Narvik and Tromsø, Northern Norway’s Polar Park makes visiting wolves possible. The Artic Wildlife Centre has many species living there: from bears, wolves, lynx, wolverines and foxes, to prey animals such as deer, elk, and reindeer, as well as livestock. The facility aims to provide a ‘Norwegian wilderness experience’ with the surroundings that Norway has to offer, and a natural home to its wildlife. There is also a chance to live amongst the endangered animals in the Wolf Cabin.

wolves, churches, travel, paywall



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Visiting wolves and churches in Northern Norway

Published on Monday, 25th January, 2016 at 22:36 under the entertainment category, by Sarah Bostock and Michael Sandelson   .

Hotels may offer the all-inclusive breakfast and additional tours, but what you won’t find is the chance to live and sleep amongst wolves. Troms County also offers a listed church.

A view from inside Wolf Lodge
A view from inside Wolf Lodge
Photo: By kind permission of Polar Park


Located in Bardu (Northern Sámi: Bearddu suohkan, Kvensk: Perttulan komuuni) between Narvik and Tromsø, Northern Norway’s Polar Park makes visiting wolves possible. The Artic Wildlife Centre has many species living there: from bears, wolves, lynx, wolverines and foxes, to prey animals such as deer, elk, and reindeer, as well as livestock.

The facility aims to provide a ‘Norwegian wilderness experience’ with the surroundings that Norway has to offer, and a natural home to its wildlife. There is also a chance to live amongst the endangered animals in the Wolf Cabin.

This accommodation, with its large windows that survey the area, allows people to interact safely with wolves from the comfort of their living room. A view of the Northern Lights is also possible (when visible) without leaving the accommodation by using its roof windows.

The Park also offers a Wolf Visit to guests searching for a closer interaction with the animals (visitors must be at least 18 years of age) with a supervised visit. According to staff, wolves are genetically afraid of humans. These wolves, on the other hand, are socialised and accustomed to people becoming part of their natural surroundings.

Bardu Church
Bardu Church
Chmee2/Wikimedia Commons
If wolves are not for you, then a visit to Bardu Kirke (Church) might be. Sanctified in 1829 and restored in 1840, the eight-sided timber construction was designed by Norwegian builder Ole Olsen Lundberg.

It is similar to Tynset Church (where Lundberg was from), which is located in eastern Norway’s Hedmark County. Bardu Church is located in a large quadrangular steeple that faces west, where the entrance is. The choir is located in the east.

The Church, which got a new organ in 1870, now has space for just 135 people after the gallery was closed (220 was the original number). It is part of the Bardu Parish in the Indre Troms Deanery in the Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland. Clad with vertical, white-painted panelling, the roof is covered with wooden shingles, and the building is very well-preserved.

Bardu Church is situated on a level plain where the Bardu River (Barduelva) makes a sharp turn – the Bardu River belongs to the drainage basin Målselvvassdraget, of which Målselva is also a part. Together, Barduelva and Målselva form Troms County’s largest river, which has a length of about 70 kilometres (some 43.4 miles).

Facts

  • The Polar Park is one of the animal parks in the world with the largest area per animal with some 1,100 decares (1 decare=1,000 square meters, or about 10,764 square feet).
  • Other activities at the facility include camping and fishing in the river, zip-lining across the landscape, and photography possibilities with no metal fences to block the shot, according to staff.
  • The Polar Park is open almost all-year-round.
  • Bardu Church is open for visitors in July, Monday to Friday between 8 am and 3 pm local time.
  • Airline Norwegian flies to Bardufoss Snowman Airport (BDU), while Norwegian, SAS, and Widerøe fly to Evenes Narvik/Harstad Airport (EVE). Car journeys from both airports are about 50 minutes and 1 hour, respectively.
  • Car rental companies Avis, Budget, Europcar, and Sixt have facilities at Bardufoss and Evenes Airports.

(Sources: Polar Park, Bardu Municipality, The University of Tromsø Library’s Architecture Guide for Northern Norway and Svalbard, Store norske leksikon, Wikipedia)



Published on Monday, 25th January, 2016 at 22:36 under the entertainment category, by Sarah Bostock and Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: wolves, churches, travel, paywall.





  
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