08 March: International women’s day / News / The Foreigner

08 March: International women’s day. There were many events and discussions around the country yesterday. Here is a summary of some of the most important. On 05 March Liv Navarsete, the Transport Minister and leader of the Centre Party (Sp), made it clear to Stavanger Aftenblad that her party will fight hard for a pot or money to be set aside for equal pay. “It’s been one year since the commission for equal pay published its report. It showed that women in female-dominated professions systematically receive lower salaries than men in male-dominated professions with the same level of education”, she told them.

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08 March: International women’s day

Published on Sunday, 8th March, 2009 at 23:18 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 9th March 2009 at 09:17.

There were many events and discussions around the country yesterday. Here is a summary of some of the most important.

A calender
A calender
Photo: mgkaya/Istockphotos


The gap in pay

On 05 March Liv Navarsete, the Transport Minister and leader of the Centre Party (Sp), made it clear to Stavanger Aftenblad that her party will fight hard for a pot or money to be set aside for equal pay.

“It’s been one year since the commission for equal pay published its report. It showed that women in female-dominated professions systematically receive lower salaries than men in male-dominated professions with the same level of education”, she told them.

The nursing and teaching professions have an over-representation of women, whilst it is mainly men that are prevalent in engineering. All three groups have four years of higher education, but women receive 20 percent less pay.

The salary-raises

It is women who represent the majority of the workforce in kindergartens. Kristin Halvorsen, both leader of the Socialist Left party (SV) and the Minister of Finance, has said that after having spent billions on building enough of them to cover the demand, it’s time for a higher salary.

“The next big priority for SV will be a substantial pay-rise in order to level the gap in salary between women and men. Higher pay for women’s professions will probably be the most important welfare-reform for the next period in government”, she told Dagbladet.

The military

There is only drafting for men in to the Norwegian military, despite the fact that an ever-increasing number of women wish to and can join. This is something that the Labour party’s (Ap) Minister of Defence wishes to change. She put her proposal forward at a conference on Friday 06 March.

“The introduction of compulsory service for women will mean that we will be able to inform the entire younger generation about the military. I hope that this will increase the number of women in the Defence force.”

The Church

In his ordination speech today Halvor Nordhaug, the new bishop of Bergen is reported as saying to the Norwegian Telegram Bureau (NTB) that

“in Bjørgvin, the number of women priests is unfortunately far too low. I hope that whilst I am bishop, we will see a marked change for the better.”

The protest

The writer Sara Azmeh Rasmussen took the day as an opportunity to protest against the segregation of women by burning a hijab. After it had ignited, an angry group of hijab supporters hurled snowballs at her. She told NTB that she wished to protest against the codes that are associated with it. Although she was very disappointed by this response from the Norwegian Muslim community, she was prepared to take the consequences of her actions.

“This could mean that I have now put myself in danger, but it’s a choice that I have taken…I am not going to hide.”

The figures

Although the importance of this day must not be underestimated, membership-levels in the Norwegian women’s organisations are falling. But Torill Nustad, leader of the Norwegian Women’s Front, told NTB that she doesn’t see this fall as a result of women turning their backs to them.

“Many of our activists have conquered new positions with the women’s movement as a platform. Whilst we are weakened, many of our members have become important voices in the fields of athletics, politics, culture, and the trade union movement.”



Published on Sunday, 8th March, 2009 at 23:18 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 9th March 2009 at 09:17.

This post has the following tags: international, women, 08, march, protest, salary.





  
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