Arctic communities’ complexity in focus / News / The Foreigner

Arctic communities’ complexity in focus. Norway’s annual Arctic Arts Festival looks at the issue via an exhibition. This year’s project, at the Gallery of Northern Norway in Troms County’s Harstad, is titled “Subsistence” and contains several elements. The lives of Arctic communities will be shown via discussions, interviews and visual narratives centring on locals.

arctic, climate, globalwarming, environment, art, exhibition, tourism, paywall



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Arctic communities’ complexity in focus

Published on Thursday, 19th January, 2017 at 18:51 under the news category, by Charlotte Bryan.

Norway’s annual Arctic Arts Festival looks at the issue via an exhibition.

Arctic icebergs
Arctic icebergs
Photo: Polar Cruises/Flickr


This year’s project, at the Gallery of Northern Norway in Troms County’s Harstad, is titled “Subsistence” and contains several elements.

The lives of Arctic communities will be shown via discussions, interviews and visual narratives centring on locals.

Various contemporary works with a focus on the circumpolar area will fill the event, which will take a detailed stance at the risks and consequences of Arctic areas becoming consumer entities.

Director of the Arctic Arts Festival Maria Utsi says in a statement that hosting this international exhibition “is particularly important for us”.

She also comments on collaboration with other strong northern hemisphere institutions such as the Northern Norway Art Museum in Tromsø and Alaska’s Anchorage Museum.

“The Arctic Arts Festival has an ambition to initiate cooperation throughout the regional and international culture and art institutions, and thus make room for new ideas and innovative projects,” she explains.

Growing Arctic tourism has given rise to speculation as to whether locals will struggle to accommodate the amount of tourists travelling there.

Moreover, threats to the Arctic such as ice melting will restrict the region’s ability to reflect heat to space, furthering global warming. Melting glaciers, sea ice, and tundra could lead to a global sea level rise.

Anchorage Museum Director Julie Decker, one of the exhibition’s curators, remarks that the reliance of nature and the environment is a determining fact of subsistence in the North.

At the same time, the project will not romanticise the reality of survival, but will convey these dimensions’ complexity.

“There is a growing interest and popularity of the North and in the centre of major policy decisions, and that makes it even more important to get the human perspective and voice into consideration. It is crucial that we learn to tell our own story and take ownership to it,” she says.

“Subsistence”, co-curated by Director of the Northern Norway Art Museum, Jérémie Michael McGowan, takes place between 24th June and 1st July.




Published on Thursday, 19th January, 2017 at 18:51 under the news category, by Charlotte Bryan.

This post has the following tags: arctic, climate, globalwarming, environment, art, exhibition, tourism, paywall.





  
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