Arctic Svalbard preserves Latin America records / News / The Foreigner

Arctic Svalbard preserves Latin America records. An abandoned coal mine in Norway’s Longyearbyen will now serve to protect important documents from hackers, war, and natural disasters. The vault in Mine 3 next to theGlobal Seed Vault will contain documents to be stored on reels in the mountain. Situated in the mountainside outside the Svalbard archipelago-located town, it has not been operative for 20 years.

svalbard, data, mine, longyearbyen, security, backup, paywall



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Arctic Svalbard preserves Latin America records

Published on Tuesday, 28th March, 2017 at 15:38 under the news category, by Sarah Bostock.

An abandoned coal mine in Norway’s Longyearbyen will now serve to protect important documents from hackers, war, and natural disasters.

Mine 3, Longyearbyen
Mine 3, Longyearbyen
Photo: Bjoertvedt/Wikimedia Commons


The vault in Mine 3 next to theGlobal Seed Vault will contain documents to be stored on reels in the mountain.

Situated in the mountainside outside the Svalbard archipelago-located town, it has not been operative for 20 years.

Mexico wants to secure its history as a country, as the vaults area safe distance from the earthquakes which are a threat to the nation’sarchives

Ricardo Marques, director of Brazil’s National Archives feels it is important to secure data.

He mentions Wikileaks and cyber-attacks as some of the possible threats that they face.

Both countries are to join Norway’s Sogn og Fjordane County in storing copies of their information.

According to Pål Berg from the Store Norske Spitsbergen Kulkompani (SNSK), which has owned mines in the Svalbard archipelago since 1916, the region’s permafrost makes conditions ideal.

“Temperatures are between five and ten degrees below zero. Conditions are very stable and not affected by the seasons,”he told NRK.

Piql, the Norwegian company tasked with preserving the data, believes the technology they use will mean it will be saved for about 1,000 years.

Digital data is transferred onto high-resolution micrographic film on reels. It can be stored either in computer-readable digital format, or as human readable text or images.

NRK writes that the company has used high temperatures to help create 500 years-worth of wear, initially, to see if the reels would last.

They hope to expand testing to determine whether it is possible for the reels to withstand 1,000 years, eventually.

Piql also believes storing the information on reels will protect against cyber-attacks for anyone planning to alter, damage, or steal the files.

Online users can search for what is stored in the vaults in Svalbard, but cannot retrieve the files, having to order them instead.  

The mountainous location serving as a data vault is in a demilitarised zone under the Svalbard Treaty. Military forces are not permitted there.



Published on Tuesday, 28th March, 2017 at 15:38 under the news category, by Sarah Bostock.

This post has the following tags: svalbard, data, mine, longyearbyen, security, backup, paywall.





  
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