Better school pupils may get a boost / News / The Foreigner

Better school pupils may get a boost. Norway schoolchildren with major learning potential should be catered for in Norwegian schools, a new report says. “Many pupils who learn quicker and more than others are not given enough challenges at school,” Jan Sivert Jøsendal, head of the government-appointed Jøsendal Committee stated at today’s press conference. One of the Committee’s recommendations is to alter the Education Act.

education, schools, talent, knowledge, curriculum, teachers, paywall



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Better school pupils may get a boost

Published on Thursday, 15th September, 2016 at 13:16 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 15th September 2016 at 13:31.

Norway schoolchildren with major learning potential should be catered for in Norwegian schools, a new report says.

Pencil and pen collection
Pencil and pen collection
Photo: Sleeping Sun/Flickr


“Many pupils who learn quicker and more than others are not given enough challenges at school,” Jan Sivert Jøsendal, head of the government-appointed Jøsendal Committee stated at today’s press conference.

One of the Committee’s recommendations is to alter the Education Act.

The aim of this would be to include this group in so-termed adapted education, which is based on the same National Curriculum for all and that takes account of pupils with special needs.

The Committee’s advice also includes examining framework conditions, knowledge, research, education, and measures regarding teacher qualification and educational practice.

Some 93,500 students (10-15 per cent) classified as having major learning potential attended compulsory schools (Primary and Secondary) in Norway in the previous School Year, according to the Committee.

National daily Aftenposten also reports that the government-appointed body defines these pupils as performing at a high academic level, having potential to reach the highest academic levels, and possessing special abilities and talents.

Minister of Education and Research Torbjørn Røe Isaksen, who was handed the report, Thursday, called the Committee’s assessment “exciting”.

At the same time, he thinks that there is no need for classes dedicated to specially-talented pupils.

Norwegian schools should be good enough to meet this group so that they are neither tempted to move abroad, nor attend schools for gifted children.

Education unions have attacked education schemes for talented students, and increasing numbers of pupils have been applying for private schools and international schools in recent years.

The Rightist bipartite coalition has also mentioned increasing the number of private schools in Norway.




Published on Thursday, 15th September, 2016 at 13:16 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 15th September 2016 at 13:31.

This post has the following tags: education, schools, talent, knowledge, curriculum, teachers, paywall.





  
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